New Pet Dogs

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  • We havent bought him treats yet so we just give him praises and lovins

    He pees and poops on his own outside. Its just getting him to understand where to pee (on the pad) when hes inside and we cant take him out at the moment lol. He is SUPER smart at 8 weeks
  • @CalforniaChrome1121 I love merles, too. Personally, I have always wanted an Irish setter. I love how goofy they are and yet beautiful. I would name her Trixie.
  • @Sai4215, Irish Setters are amazing my cousin use to use them for hunting but now he just uses redbone coonhounds instead. When people first meet me they think that I have two Australian Shepherds. They are shocked when I tell them that I only have one which is Deuce. Then they usually say that I am wrong or I don't know my dog breeds cause Texas is obviously a Aussie since he is blue merle. Then again if you think about it seeing a blue merle Rough Collie isn't something you see every day they are usually sable and white and look like the famous Lassie.
  • Nice looking dog, Sia, and she has a great smile.
  • Thank you VA_in_CA. What a nice thing to say : )
  • We raised Irish setters when I was growing up. Then they got overly popular. Aging myself. Hope to get another this year. Maybe retired showdog. Have been without a dog a couple of years since I put down my Chessie who was beautiful and smart but many problems. She has fear agrssion issues. I kept her safe but she limited our outing because of her behavior unpredictability. She bit people without warning. I adopted her at 5 and learned she had undergone some shock training for behavior modification not on my watch. Has made me hesitant in adopting again.
  • She lived to be 17 and then I had to put her down when her hips gave out and she could not get up by herself. Hard decision but she was too big to carry outside after awhile. Not like a dauchshund who could Gerry rig a contraption to support hind end. It was very hard at end. Made decision about her quality of life and I guess mine.
  • @KMM I have two retired show Irish setters sleeping on the couch right now. lol The breed is not as popular these days and most show breeders are very conscientious on getting health clearances before breeding, as well as breeding temperamentally sound dogs. They are a beautiful, fun-loving breed, and fantastic in the field hunting upland fowl. I have never in my life heard of them hunting raccoon or other vermin though........
  • I trained our first Irish Setter Molly how to cast for pheasants after reading a book at 12. Actually she trained me. Our my grandmother's PA farm of about 60 acres. My family grew up in France and Germany. Friends of family Had 2 Irish setters. We kids fell in love. My father promised when we got back to states we could get an Irish Setter. Molly was our first and started a few generations of Irish Setters for us. I taught her how to jump obstacles before I did training later on to learn how to jump my horses. Of course very different. K
  • They don't hunt raccoon. My cousin who use to own them used them as gun dogs. Now that same cousin has coonhounds (mainly redbone coonhounds and I believe a few blue ticked coonhounds and I think one black and tan coonhound) he uses them to make the raccoon population around his house down. He had a few Irish setters (red) and then a Irish Red and White Setter.
  • Wonderful story @KMM ! I always love hearing how people grew up with their Irish setters. They are such a wonderful family dog. I can't imagine not having one, or two, or three, or more! :-)
  • They are bird dogs on land and are known for soft mouths. Carry the bird without biting into it. Actually Molly instinctively did that bringing back some baby rabbits after nest was disturbed by lawn mower. Funny. Another story. We kids released Molly's rescued bunnies a few weeks later. We lived in countryside suburbs in a place a few years earlier had been farms and not totally developed. K
  • Correct -- they are bread to hunt upland game, like pheasant, grouse, chukkar. Not a water dog and certainly not a hound. Yes, they do have very soft mouths.....I have worked my dogs on birds and the instinct is amazing.
  • That's great. I rememeber when we were kids my cousin's Irish Red and White Setter named Athena, and two of his Irish Setters named Thunder and Denver brought back baby ducks. Each of them had one in their mouth and the ducks were not injuried. My cousins wife was shocked since ducks are birds and setters are bird dogs. I also remember a few weeks later we ended up releasing the baby ducks into the pond that is in my cousins back yard. The ducks have been around ever since, they leave alot during the day hit then they show back up at night time and share the chicken coop that he has with the chickens.
  • Thanks for your appreciation Sarinne. One of my favorite movies as a kid was Big Red. Never mind Lassie, Run Tin Tin, and Old Yeller. Aging myself. I saw Bambi when it was fist released in French. Haha. I think I understood it inFrench. Learned how to read French before English because I went toFrench Elementary school for preschool and first grade.
  • @KMM -- me too and you are welcome! Big Red is my favorite family movie.

    Do you speak any other languages?
  • Bad German. And one intensive course of Russian in college where nothing is left. Think in this day in age should learn Spanish in u.s. Flirting with idea of Italian but need to re study French. Thanks for asking.
  • Wow, @KMM you seem to have a talent in learning languages. Of course I am interested! :-)

    @Rachel -- very cute. We have a covey of stuffed quail around here. lol
  • I found this article. Figured id post it here. The photos alone are a real eye opener.
    http://boredomtherapy.com/selective-dog-breeding/

    Wish they would of done more breeds.
  • Whats interesting to me is that not all modern purebred dogs look like the ones on the right. Some actually look like the 1915 examples. My boxer for example, didnt have a short muzzle. She had a normal muzzle but u could still tell she was a boxer. I habe seen st bernards look like the 1915 example as well. The old genes are still around :)
  • Wow, that is so sad! Leave it to humans to screw everything up. Here we go playing God again just because we can.
  • VA_in_CAVA_in_CA Member
    edited February 2015
    You should see what they've done with Siamese cats. They've made them really narrow-faced with pointy muzzles and heads and huge ears. They look like freaks. The old-fashioned kind crop up every now and again and they are sold as "pet-quality." We had one of those back in the late 70s--early 80s, a purebred who had an "apple head," which is how they describe one that has a normal-shaped head. Now, I have a seal-point, very normal looking cat, who looks like an old-fashioned Siamese cat. It's because she's not a purebred. Very sad. Unfortunately the people who originally decided to breed for tiny wedge-shaped heads and small cats had bad taste. And now the breed is stuck with it. Bleah.

    Image and video hosting by TinyPic
    from Breed Profile, Cat Fancy Assn.

    I need to get a better picture of her, but here is my normal-looking, non-purebred Siamese, Zenny.
    Image and video hosting by TinyPic

    Picture by VA_in_CA, with a disposable camera in 2011 and scanned into computer.
  • That's really sad, VA_in_CA. I grew up with Siamese cats and they looked like yours. One of ours did have crossed eyes, though. Ours didn't look anything like that freaky cat with the big ears.
  • RachelRachel Member
    edited February 2015
    Aliens. They look like aliens lol. I mean the top pic of course LOL. Zenny is a pretty kitty.
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