Silver Charm

All things Silver Charm can be discussed here. Recently he arrived at Old Friends retirement haven for Thoroughbreds in KY. Here are photos of his arrival:

http://www.oldfriendsequine.org/horses/silver-charm-17896.html

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Comments

  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited December 2014
    Yaay! Welcome back Silver Charm! You surely deserve it!
  • Just looove this photo and caption by Rachel!
    Silver Charm. Laura Battles photo. He must be thinking "what kinda stud farm is this?" the Stud Muffin Farm of course!

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  • These are fantastic photos of Silver Charm arriving at Old Friends on Rachel's link below:
  • btw...I haven't been keeping up with Silver Charm while he was in Japan...but Silver Charm is only 20 years old could someone explain the reason once again why he was retired from stud duty? Thanks ahead.
  • Declining fertility is the reason why he was pensioned
  • OK...glad it was that situation rather than one of declining health so we can enjoy him for many more years to come at Old Friends. :oD
  • RachelRachel Member
    edited December 2014
    Interesting tid bit on Silver Charm......his dam, Bonnie's Poker, lived out the rest of her days at Old Friends :)

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  • Video of Silver Charm arriving at Old Friends

  • Michael is so happy, his grin is threatening to split his face.
  • Tears of joy for SC and Old Friends. If there was ever a win-win, this is it.
  • Little Silver Charm tweet about Silver Charm
    It would be soo cool if temperment-wise, Big Silver Charm could have a mini version of himself to share a paddock with for a companion... "small" chance that happening tho'.  ):oP

  • LSC may be small, but he's still Big Man On Campus.
  • LSC may be small, but he's still Big Man On Campus.
    LoL! For sure!
  • I hope so. We all need campanions and social interactions of some sort. Worried about these retired old boys. Different when they have jobs. Racing, breeding stallions et all. Maybe human interaction is enough? Big question. Don't know answer. What are the best social interactions for retired stallion?
  • All stallions are kept by themselves, even the sweet ones. They're highly territorial. They can have "across-the-fence" friendships, though. At Old Friends, when Rapid Redux first arrived, he became friends with no less a patriarch than Gulch. RR, of course, is a gelding and can have companions (although I don't know if he does), but Gulch was his across-the-fence buddy.
  • carolinarkansascarolinarkansas hot springs, arkansasMember
    Rapid has recently been shown with his paddock friend.....Amazombie....love it that these two are together
  • Honestly, I'm more concerned about the system shock of change of location on a 20 year old stallion.

    I believe Silver Charm is the first healthy, senior, retired stallion to relocate like this. I'm NOT counting Alysheba because he had a medical condition when he was retired and returned to the United States.

    It's a lot to ask of any animal, to upset their routine so drastically, even with the best will in the world. I'm sure Old Friend's is aware of this and taking every precaution and watching Silver Charm like a hawk for any sign out of the ordinary.

    But the hard fact is, some much younger stallions have expressed distress over shuttling, even been lost (War Pass) and that's just for a short duration. Not the change of having spent a decade in another part of the world and then coming back.

    Be interesting to see if he acclimates and I'd love for Old Friends to maybe publish how they went about it for any future situations like this one.
  • edited December 2014
    Rapid has recently been shown with his paddock friend.....Amazombie....love it that these two are together
    Oh, good. I knew Amazombie was out with someone famous but couldn't remember who. I hope they find a good pal for the Dude.
  • Honestly, I'm more concerned about the system shock of change of location on a 20 year old stallion.

    I believe Silver Charm is the first healthy, senior, retired stallion to relocate like this. I'm NOT counting Alysheba because he had a medical condition when he was retired and returned to the United States.

    It's a lot to ask of any animal, to upset their routine so drastically, even with the best will in the world. I'm sure Old Friend's is aware of this and taking every precaution and watching Silver Charm like a hawk for any sign out of the ordinary.

    But the hard fact is, some much younger stallions have expressed distress over shuttling, even been lost (War Pass) and that's just for a short duration. Not the change of having spent a decade in another part of the world and then coming back.

    Be interesting to see if he acclimates and I'd love for Old Friends to maybe publish how they went about it for any future situations like this one.
    OF has previously retired stallions from Japan. Creator and Sunshine Forever were the first (they came together), followed by Ogygian and then Wallenda. Although it's rough on them, they have the best care available during their trips. Ogygian wasn't in good shape when he arrived, but he's thriving now, so they are doing something right.

    Here's a little bit on Wallenda's return, from his page:
    http://www.oldfriendsequine.org/horses/wallenda-32.html

    There are pictures.
  • Ah! Okay, so SC isn't the first.

    Excellent, then no doubt OF has a process in place to help with the transition. Would still be interesting to hear how they go about it. Of course each horse is different but if there are any general steps they follow.
  • I think much of what they do is dictated by legal requirements. The horse is first quarantined in Japan for (I think) three weeks. He then flies from Hokkaido on a great circle route that stops in Anchorage for refueling (the horse stays on the plane), then proceeds to a port with a quarantine facility (New York or Chicago in these cases--LA has one but it's not en route from Hokkaido). After 3 days required quarantine, the horse travels by Sallee Van to Kentucky.

    Once he gets to Kentucky, the stallion (retirees are not excused) has to go through a state-mandated testing protocol for Contagious Equine Metritis (CEM). For those reading along, It's an STD, not something that other horses will catch due to proximity. The protocol has specific steps and takes three weeks. SC is going to be tested at Rood and Riddle, a short van ride from OF. During this time, SC will likely be in OF's small barn, which is not included on the tours. By the time his three weeks of testing are up, he will probably have settled in and be ready to greet visitors. They will give him as much time as he needs, but it seems like he's cool, calm, and collected and shouldn't have trouble adjusting. If he's happy being a tourist attraction he will be on the tour, but if not they won't force him. Wallenda's not.
  • Right, I know they follow those regulation based process to the letter but I was thinking more granular.

    IE: Feed. How do they go about transitioning him over? Grain and Hay are going to have slightly different compositions given the difference in geographical location and horses have such delicate systems to begin with. Does some of his Japanese based feed/hay travel with him for say a six week supply to help him transition to United States based feed? Or does he have to go cold turkey.

    Water. Again, those minute differences in molecular make-up. Do they have to treat it as they transition him over? Or test for any minerals that he may have been with/without for the past decade?

    For reference, when I moved north by one state, just one state!!! The mineral make-up difference in the water + grass was so extreme it caused my grey boy to developed painful bladder stones, TWICE. Required surgery each time to remove them when they blocked him. I had to add Apple Cider to his feed to offset them and eventually sent him back south when he was 'retired' from riding, just so the risk was removed completely.

    Handling. Grooming and routine. He's spend a decade being interacted with in the Japanese language, learning how to respond to his Japanese handler's cues. There are some general universal ways of handling horses but each country has differences.

    Just those little details.
  • Interesting questions, all. Maybe post them on OF's Facebook page? I bet you'd get a response.

    You mentioned water--that reminds me of Zenyatta's travelling with her favorite Fiji water. And her beer, of course. :-)

    There's a story about the great Kincsem, who always traveled with her own water. Once time they ran out, and her handlers tried all sorts of different water sources until they found one she'd deign to drink from. It's at Baden-Baden and is still called Kincsem's Spring (or Fountain).
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