Horses in Parades and Special Exhibitions

I created this thread for this year's Kamehameha Day Parade featuring Pa'u Riders and their floral adorned horses . However, I wanted to also provide a discussion where other forum members had a place to share their personal photos taken of horses or other equines in parades or equine exhibitions. Note: Your photos of mules, donkeys and other equine species are acceptable in this thread as well. Please remember to give yourself photos credits!
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  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited June 2015
    JUNE 11, 2015, THURSDAY:
    THE OPENING CEREMONY HONORING KING KAMEHAMEHA...


    image
    ▲The Sons and Daughters of Hawaiian Warriors Mamakakua annually celebrate the mighty King Kamehameha! The Ceremony opened with Kamehameha's historical background, song, oli (chanting) and ended in prayer. This ceremony was performed at the statue of King Kamehameha statue fronting Aliiolani Hale.
    (from www.hawaiinewsnow.com)

    image ▲Close-up view of the "oli" (chant) being performed.

    image ▲Floral and food offerings wrapped in ti leaves being presented at the base of King Kamehameha's statue

    image ▲Close-Up of the offerings

    image ▲The closing ceremony ends in a prayer.

    Historic Background:
    Kamehameha the Great (Kamehameha I) was the first ruler of Hawaii from 1782 until his death on May 8, 1819. He was born sometime in November 1758 in Kohala, Hawaii. He is famed as the first ruler to unite the Islands of Hawaii. He also introduced laws to uphold human rights in combat situations and was known as a fair and stable leader. His name means "lonely" or "loneliness".

    In 1871, the great-grandson of Kamehameha the Great, known as Kamehameha V, passed a royal decree that Kamehameha Day should be celebrated. The day was first observed on June 11, 1872 and is one of the first holidays proclaimed by the Hawaii State Legislature after Hawaii became a US state in 1959.
    (from ags.hawaii.gov/kamehameha & www.timeanddate.com/holidays/kamehameha-day)

    Trivia: The statue of King Kamehameha at Aliiolani Hale is actually the second statue caste! The original statue was "completed In 1883. The statue was on its way to Hawaii when the ship sunk off the Falkland Islands and the statue assumed lost. A second statue was quickly re-cast. Meanwhile, some Falkland-islanders found the original and sold it to the captain of the wrecked ship. He, in turn, sold it to Gibson for $875. Both statues arrived. The first stands on Hawaii Island in the king’s birthplace, Kohala. The second is in Downtown Honolulu. The third statue was commissioned when Hawaii became a state. It was unveiled in 1969 and stood in the United States Capitol beside the Father Damien of Molokai statue. It was the heaviest of all the statues, weighing in at 15,000 pounds. When Barack Obama was nominated as a candidate for president the statue was moved from a dark back corner of Statuary Hall to a very prominent position in Emancipation Hall in the new visitor center"
    Excerpt from www.hawaii.com

    Coming up next...
    The Lei Draping Ceremony
  • Interesting information, but I don't see any horses in any of the photos. Did I miss some of the pictures? Thanks!
  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited June 2015
    JUNE 12, 2015, FRIDAY
    THE KING KAMEHAMEHA STATUE LEI DRAPING CEREMONY...

    image
    From days before and early this morning, the leis were being sewn by members of the Royal Societies such as the Ladies of Ahahui Ka'ahumanu and several volunteers in preparation for the 3:00pm Lei Draping Ceremony. The statue of King Kamehameha stands 15 feet tall and long lengths of floral leis are painstakingly sewn with each lei reaching the length of at least 30 feet long! On the grounds of Aliiolani Hale, a long white tent was erected for sun protection with a continuous long work table as women and men labored on these floral creations. The community had donated several varieties of flowers, leaves and ferns. These lengths of leis were carefully draped over the arms of King Kamehameha's statue using a bucket (cherry picker) truck. Unfortunately, I could not attend the lei draping ceremony, but these photos were taken just two hours later.

    image ▲Close-up are lengths of maile, ilima, puakenikeni, kukui nut leaves, red and yellow plumeria, ti leaves, orchids, Spanish Moss (Pele's Hair), mock orange leaves, palapalai and laua'e fern leaves among several other varieties of flowers and leaves.

    image ▲The Iolani Palace-the site of this year's gathering place for the Pa'u Riders at the start of the Kamehameha Day Parade.

    Coming up next...
    JUNE 13, 2015, SATURDAY
    Pa'u Riders and their horses gather at the Iolani Palace grounds.
  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited June 2015
    Interesting information, but I don't see any horses in any of the photos. Did I miss some of the pictures? Thanks!
    Not to worry Celeste_in_TX...this was a 3-day event and the horses will be coming up on the next posting. The first two days were just an introduction to the Kamehameha Day Parade where I featured the Pa'u Riders and their horses. :oD
  • Very interesting, Paniolo_Gal, thanks for sharing! I really enjoy learning about different cultures and traditions. :) I'm excited to see the horses in the next few days! Is Kamehameha I featured on Hawaii's quarter? His statue looks familiar.
  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited June 2015
    Before I post photos of the 2015 Kamehameha Day Pa'u Riders...
    Just a little background information.


    image An 1880s Photo of Pa'u Riders from Peter T. Young

    THE ORIGINS OF THE PA'U RIDER:
    In 1803, an American ship captained by William Shaler and Richard Cleveland arrived with three horses aboard. They were intended as "gifts to King Kamehameha". In the 1820s and 1830s, more horses were brought over from California and equine riding became a means of transportation in the decades that followed. The origination of the female horsewoman started in the Big Island of Hawaii. The Hawaiian women chose to ride astride instead of sidesaddle. Queen Emma (The Queen consort to King Kamehameha IV who reigned from 1856 to 1863) was known to be an expert equestrian rider. They would wear pa'u (Hawaiian for "skirt") to cover their fancy dresses (holokū) worn to attend parties. The length of this outer covering is approximately 12 yards of a single length of fabric and traditionally held with 6 pieces of unpolished kukui nuts. The early pa'u fabric was primarily calico or gingham and later evolved to more luxurious satin as seen on contemporary Pa'u Riders.

    In the early 1900s automobiles were introduced to Hawaii and pa'u riding faded. It was rejuvenated when a group of women gathered to create a society to keep the culture going. The first "Floral Parade" featuring Pa'u Riders began on 2/22/1906 and proved to be a tremendous success. In 1907, 8 Island Princesses were added to the parade. Today, these women participate in the floral parade on Kamehameha Day, an official State Holiday celebrated on June 11.
    http://www.hawaiipauriders.org/history/

    image A late 1800s-early 1900s photo of a regal looking Pa'u Rider...
    She reminds me of the beautiful Princess Kaiulani but the rider is not identified


    A background link to the lovely Princess Kaiulani:
    http://www.thekaiulaniproject.com/about_princess_kaiulani.htm
  • KMMKMM Member
    Nice history and pics.
  • Oh how cool!!! I love the look of all those leis draped on the statue and can try to imagine how wonderful the air must smell from all the flowers. Oh my!!! Thanks for the back ground info on the Pa'u Riders also. Can't wait for more!
  • Very interesting, Paniolo_Gal, thanks for sharing! I really enjoy learning about different cultures and traditions. :) I'm excited to see the horses in the next few days! Is Kamehameha I featured on Hawaii's quarter? His statue looks familiar.
    Ever watch the Hawaii Five-0 reboot? HQ is in the 'Iolani Palace, and the statue is right outside, and they feature it quite often in establishing shots.

  • Very interesting, Paniolo_Gal, thanks for sharing! I really enjoy learning about different cultures and traditions. :) I'm excited to see the horses in the next few days! Is Kamehameha I featured on Hawaii's quarter? His statue looks familiar.


    Ever watch the Hawaii Five-0 reboot? HQ is in the 'Iolani Palace, and the statue is right outside, and they feature it quite often in establishing shots.

    No I never have, but that's cool they show the statue in it.
  • Very interesting, Paniolo_Gal, thanks for sharing! I really enjoy learning about different cultures and traditions. :) I'm excited to see the horses in the next few days! Is Kamehameha I featured on Hawaii's quarter? His statue looks familiar.
    Very observant Horselover24! Yes...it is the statue of King Kamehameha on the quarter representing Hawaii. :oD

    Here's a link to the image for Hawaii's Quarter:
    http://atoztheusa.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-hawaii-quarter.html

  • Very interesting, Paniolo_Gal, thanks for sharing! I really enjoy learning about different cultures and traditions. :) I'm excited to see the horses in the next few days! Is Kamehameha I featured on Hawaii's quarter? His statue looks familiar.

    Very observant Horselover24! Yes...it is the statue of King Kamehameha on the quarter representing Hawaii. :oD

    Here's a link to the image for Hawaii's Quarter:
    http://atoztheusa.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-hawaii-quarter.html

    Thank you! I collect quarters, so this was an interesting read for me. :)

  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited June 2015
    JUNE 13, 2015, SATURDAY

    FIRST TO ENTER THE IOLANI PALACE GROUNDS...THE MALE RIDERS
    THE BANNER PAGES AND PA'U MARSHALS


    imageThe Lead Banner Page holding the banner which reads:
    "King Kamehameha Celebration Parade"


    imageSecond is the Page that holds the banner: "Pa'u Marshal"

    The first to arrive at the Palace grounds were the male riders, called the Pa'u Marshals led in by the Banner Pages. The Pa'u Marshals play an important role, keeping order and managing the riders during the duration of the parade. These Marshals also make sure that all the riders and horses remain safe during the parade procession. The female Pa'u Riders, being at a disadvantage due to their long flowing fabrics, would need outside help. The Pa'u Marshals and the male attendants (outriders) for each Island are responsible for taking care of runaway horses or any other equine issues that could arise during the long trek to Kapiolani Park.

    imageThe Pa'u Marshals. A striking black and white Tobiano caught my eye as she entered the grounds. See following photos of her.

    imageHere is a close-up photo of a Pa'u Marshall on his beautiful Tobiano (pinto) mare named Brooklyn who was shown earlier entering the Palace grounds. They were resting along the wall of the Iolani Barracks before the parade started. In the background rests a poop squad who would trail behind each Pa'u Court to make sure the streets remain clean.

    imageThe color coordinated black and white with a splash of red presentation of both Brooklyn and the Pa'u Marshall. The rider is wearing a haku lei made of yellow plumeria around his cowboy hat and leis of twisted ti leaves with polished black kukui nuts. Brooklyn is wearing an open, draped horse version of the ti leaf lei.

    imageThe Lead Banner Pages

    imageA close-up of an unusual wavy patterned coat and mane on this Quarter Horse Sabino ridden by a Pa'u Marshal. The open lei on the horse looks to be twisted rope ti leaves with ti leaves shaped to look like Maile.

    imageThe unusual textured Sabino shown above and Pa'u Marshal waiting for the parade
    to start next to the Iolani Barracks.


    OTHER MALE RIDERS...THE PA'U OUTRIDERS
    imageThe Male Attendant (Outrider) representing the Island of Kauai wearing purple

    imageThe Male Attendant (Outrider) representing the Island of Lanai wearing orange. Note the green round balls hanging around the horse's neck. These are gourds and when dried, are called "ipu" that are used as percussion instruments in hula.

    Each Island has a pair of male attendants called outriders in their Court. These outriders wear the colors of the Island they represent. As mentioned earlier, they make sure that the Pa'u Riders and horses remain safe as the trek to Kapiolani Park will take about one hour with all sorts of vehicular noises, pedestrian crowds and cheers along the way and these disturbances could spook the horses.

    imageThe Male Attendant (Outrider) representing the Island of Maui wearing pink.

    imageThe Male Attendant (Outrider) to the Pa'u Queen wearing burgundy accented with yellow. This was different than previous Kam Day Parades as the Pa'u Queen and her Court usually wore white.

    NEXT UP...THE PALACE GROUNDS FILLED WITH COLOR AS THE PA'U RIDERS GATHERED BEFORE THE PARADE
  • Beautiful! Thank you for sharing - this is so much fun!!
  • KMMKMM Member
    Your narrative and illustrating pictures are well done. K
  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited June 2015
    THE PALACE GROUNDS FILLED WITH COLOR...
    AS THE PA'U RIDERS GATHERED BEFORE THE PARADE!


    imageThe Pa'u Riders gathered on the Iolani Palace grounds where parade coordinators are doing last minute updates and wardrobe adjustments prior to the start of the parade. In the foreground in pink attire is the Court representing Maui and to the right is the Court representing the island of Kahoolawe in pale blue. The State Capitol is in the background on an adjoining property to the Palace.

    THE PA'U RIDERS OF THE 2015 KAMEHAMEHA PARADE:
    The 99th Annual King Kamehameha Floral Parade which ended this year at Kapiolani Park where the community celebrated with Ho'olaule'a (party & entertainment) festivities. These photos taken were at the Iolani Palace grounds where the Pa'u Riders gathered prior to the start of the Parade. The Pa'u Queen, her Princesses and Court attendants, each representing the 8 major islands surrounded the Iolani Palace Barracks, waiting for their turn to enter the main flow of the parade at the corner of Richard and King Streets.

    The Colors and Flowers of Each Island:
    Niihau has Niihau shells and their colors are brown & white
    Kauai has the mokihana and their color is purple
    Oahu has an Ilima flower and their color is yellow
    Molokai has kukui and their color is green
    Maui has the lokelani and their color is pink
    Lanai has the kaunaona and their color is orange
    Kahoolawe has hinahina and their colors are grey and blue
    Hawaii (Big Island) has the ilima flower and their color is yellow

    The Pa'u Queen and her Court of Attendants:
    Each Pa'u Unit consisted of the Pa'u Queen with her Banner Page. She presides over her court of male and female attendants. This is followed by eight Hawaiian island units: Each island consists of the Banner Page, Pa'u Princess, two or more female attendants and two male outriders. Their glorious floral ensemble (horse & rider) involved several weeks of hard work preparing for the day's parade which started at 9:00a on 6/13/15. Each year, they rotate the sequence of the eight Islands. This year, the Pa'u Queen will be followed by the northerly Island of Niihau and will then proceed southward down the chain of the Hawaiian Islands...ending with the Island of Hawaii (The Big Island).

    imageThe Pa'u Queen and her Court patiently wait at the west (Ewa) side of the grounds under shade trees by the Iolani Barracks

    Waiting For The Parade To Start...A Beautiful Show Of Colors!
    The Kamehameha Day Parade featured marching bands from various schools and honored various organizations that serve the city and state, such as the C&C Fire Department. Therefore, each Pa'u Team will be entering the parade in-between each of these various organizations. However, I will only feature the Pa'u Riders while at Iolani Palace in this review.

    image The Pa'u Princess of Kauai and her Court of attendants and Banner Page gathered along the north (Makai) side of the Palace ground. The State Capitol is shown in the background

    According to a Pa'u Princess I spoke with, they had to check in much, much earlier on parade day at the neighboring Central Middle School 2 city blocks away, preparing their horses and assembling their attire. They later had to stop traffic on Beretania Street traversing over to the Iolani Palace grounds. The floral decorations and garments involved weeks of hard work in preparing for this occasion. The women, because of their "pa'u" drape need to make sure they use the restroom and limit their liquid intake prior to the application of their pa'u (long skirts). "Lot's of Depends for sure!"

    imageThe Pa'u Princess (just behind the Banner Page) and her Court representing Niihau patiently await their turn to head onto King Street. This year they will be following directly behind the Pa'u Queen and her entourage. The Island colors are more muted as their colors are those of the rare Niihau shells which is brown and white.

    imageThe Banner Page for the Island of Oahu dressed in yellow with black with one of the attendants enjoy the morning sun on the North (Makai) side of the Palace grounds.
    Right behind them, the Island of Maui gathered. You can see the Maui Banner Page in the far background dressed in pink.


    imageThe Molokai Court rests along the East (Diamond Head) side of the Iolani Barracks.

    imageThe Lanai Court gathered at the west (Ewa) end of Iolani Palace.

    imageThe Kahoolawe Court gathered near the State Capitol in the background.

    imageThe Hawaii (Big Island) Court with the Iolani Palace in the background.

    NEXT UP...THE PA'U RIDER'S LUXURIOUS ENSEMBLE UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL
  • Oops...typo my bad! I blame my fingers that did the walking...not following my mind! LOL!

    The local word for North should have been Mauka in the entry just above. I guess I was in a rush to post and didn't proofread carefully enough. When I returned, editing time had already expired.

    Here's our local names for the 4 compass directions for the Island of Oahu:
    North: Mauka (toward the mountain)
    South: Makai (toward the ocean-Kai means "ocean" in Hawaiian)
    East: Diamond Head and depending on if you are further "east of Diamond Head"...we use the words Koko Head or Portlock
    West: Ewa and depending if you are further "west of Ewa"...we say Waianae.

    Other islands have their own directional terminology. In Maui they say the "other side", etc.
  • Fascinating and beautiful!! Thank you for sharing all of this with us. I'm so impressed with how patient and calm all of the horses appear to be. Wow.
  • THANKS so much for sharing all this! Absolutely gorgeous and informative!
  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited June 2015
    THE PA'U RIDER'S LUXURIOUS ENSEMBLE UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL...

    "Traditional leis are fashioned of natural material endemic to Hawaii and require foraging in the native forests, collecting seeds, pods, vines and flowers. Through the life stories we learned that when the pa’u riders gather their plants they go into the mountains. They chant to the gods to ask permission and give thanks for the beauty of the Earth. They take only a portion from each plant so that it can still grow and be healthy. " —Article: Pa'u Riders and the Haku Lei from earthstonestation.com

    THE PA'U QUEEN AND HER ATTENDANTS
    The Pa'u Queen wears any color of her choice. However, white is the usual color for the Queen in the Kamehameha Day Parade with Crown Flower or the fragrant Pikake (Jasmine) as the flower. However, this year, the 2015 Pa'u Queen selected a deep burgundy red instead, accented with yellow.

    image ▲ The 2015 Pa'u Queen

    image ▲The Pa'u Queen Close-Up (click on the image for an enlargement)

    The lei the Pa'u Queen wears is made of multiple strands of fragrant pakalana flowers and rose buds. Her tiara consists of roses, zinnias, crotons and I believe lavender crown flower buds (not sure) or Job's Tears. Her horse wears a lei consisting of a combination of red ti plants, sword ferns (Kupukupu), Job's Tears, red torch ginger buds and crotons with yellow zinnias (refer to 1st photo). The Pa'u Queen's presentation is a glorious botanical garden of tropical flowers and leaves!

    image ▲The lavender crown flower & buds (Calotropis gigantea)-photo by adityamadhav83 (Wikipedia)

    image ▲ The Pakalana (Telosoma cordata). Image from Top Tropicals.com

    These small Pakalana blossoms emit a heavenly fragrance and is highly prized in making leis. These blossoms grow on vines and changes colors as the flower matures from a light green to a marigold yellow. It is most fragrant at night! Also known as Tonkin Jasmin or Cowslip Creeper. The Pakalana is native to India and China. The Chinese probably introduced it into the Islands when they migrated to the Islands to work on plantation fields. In areas like Vietnam, it is also considered an edible flower! — hihort.blogspot.com

    image ▲A Variety of Red Ti Plants (Cordyline Fruticosa) from www.flickriver.com.
    Photo taken at the Lyon Arboretum

    The Ti plant was originally brought here to Hawaii by the ancient Polynesians in their canoes. The plant comes in a variable color ranging from green to deep maroon or variegated. Parts of the ti plant were used for medicinal purposes and it's leaves were used as food wrappers, plates, cups and table coverings among various other utilitarian uses including clothes (hula skirts), sandals and braided into leis. The roots were baked and eaten or fermented into alcohol. It was also used for various ceremonial and religious purposes. The ti plant is believed to bring good luck as well! — wildlifeofhawaii.com and mrec.ifas.ufl.edu

    image▲ The Pa'u Queen's Male (Outrider) & Female Attendants. The red roan's lei appears to consist of crotons, kukui leaves, zinnias, red ti leaves and torch ginger buds. The outrider and his mount has several layers of twisted ti leaf leis.

    image▲ The Pa'u Queen's Attendants and Outrider heading out to join the rest of the Kamehameha Day Parade

    NEXT UP...THE PA'U RIDERS OF NIIHAU
  • KMMKMM Member
    edited June 2015
    You do a lot of work for these posts. They are informative and well done. I meant no disrespect to your research abilities. I hope you know this now. K
  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited June 2015
    Thanks for your acknowledgement KMM.

    btw...I am not an "expert" of plants and flowers, so if any other forum members like @VA_in_CA, can help identify the flowers and leaves used in these amazing living art, please don't hesitate to provide your feedback.
  • Sorry; don't know those flowers. Maybe they're indigenous to Hawaii.
  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited June 2015
    Sorry; don't know those flowers. Maybe they're indigenous to Hawaii.
    That's alright VA_in_CA. Just thought you might know more about flowers and plants than I could decipher from the photos I took. I wish I had time to ask the Pa'u Riders but I didn't want to disturb them with these questions when they had more important issues with the parade preparations, etc.

    I found out the bracelet the Pa'u Queen is wearing on her right hand and within her mount's lei are mostly likely Job's Tears (Coix lacryma-jobi). Found that these originated from Asia and is used in traditional Chinese medicine. The seeds are good for both making jewelry and the seeds and leaves are edible as well.
    image ▲Job's Tears-Photo from www.fleur-des-tropiques.com
  • I am wondering. It is my understanding that Kahoolawe is a nature preserve and has no permanent residents. So where do the members of the Kahoolawe Court come from? Are they descendants of former residents? Or am I wrong about the preserve?
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