Anatomy of the Horse

VA_in_CAVA_in_CA Member
I've seen different articles around the Forum on elements of horse anatomy and recently found an interesting one that bears on the running ability of racehorses. I thought it would be a good idea to start this thread because it's such a basic and interesting topic. I will reference any articles on this topic that appear in others so people can go and read them. If you come across any articles related to horse anatomy in other threads, put a link here.

To start it off, here is the article I recently found: http://horses-arizona.com/pages/articles/legset.html

Comments

  • Here's a reference to an article posted previously on a different thread.
    http://www.zenyatta.com/discussions#/discussion/382/the-dynamic-of-bone-development-in-the-racehorse
  • ZenyenZenyen Member
    This is graphic, because it involves a necropsy, but it is also incredibly informative and can help give a visual to go along with the articles being posted.

  • Thanks for posting, Zenyen. I'll have to set aside some time later to watch it. A little on the long side.
  • I've seen the video that Zenen linked before and it's absolutely fantastic. Absolutely worth the watch. I might have to watch it again at some point as a refresher haha
  • I thought this was a very interesting video of a thoroughbred running in slow motion.
  • Very cool! Thanks for posting the video, @Kelsey_98
  • Wasn't sure where to put this article. Want to put it in the Coz discussion, or one on horse racing, but it's probably too controversial for those topics. Maybe Injuries? Well, I'll just put it here because growth plates (part of anatomy) are mentioned.
    http://thesoulofahorse.com/blog/no-horse-is-physically-skeletally-mature-before-5-5-to-6-years-old/
  • Wasn't sure where to put this article. Want to put it in the Coz discussion, or one on horse racing, but it's probably too controversial for those topics. Maybe Injuries? Well, I'll just put it here because growth plates (part of anatomy) are mentioned.
    http://thesoulofahorse.com/blog/no-horse-is-physically-skeletally-mature-before-5-5-to-6-years-old/
    They may not be physically mature until later, but I've also seen studies where horses that race as 2yos are less likely to break down on the racetrack and have longer careers. (For example: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.2042-3306.2011.00534.x/abstract)
  • Interesting. I suspect it depends on personal self-interest whom you believe. And I"m sure there is a lot of room for individual differences. Some people believe children shouldn't start school before age 7, others do it at age 5, but some states in the US start kids who are almost 5, so they are still 4. In Denmark, where my sister lives, they don't start kids in school until they are 7. Similar controversy.
  • A DAM ABOUT TO FOAL...
    A VIDEO OF A MARE'S ANATOMY PRIOR & DURING FOALING AND VARIOUS BIRTHING ISSUES THAT MAY ARISE...


    A very interesting documentary video that shows the positioning of the foal in the womb and the various stages of birthing in a clear, graphic manner. From the Dept of Reproduction, Obstetrics and Herd Health Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University (Belgium).

    Title: FOALinMare extended trailer
    Posted by Steven Bruneel via YouTube uploaded 11/27/2011
  • Very informative! Thanks much for posting that video.
  • This article is titled "The Truth About Bloodlines," but it goes into detail about how the anatomy of a horse and how the horse runs is more important than who its parents are. I thought it was very interesting!

    http://www.maxim.com/entertainment/bloodlines-horse-racing-2016-6

    I was hoping that maybe @Zenyen could elaborate more on how to spot a "rotary gallop" though?
  • ZenyenZenyen Member
    A slow motion camera!

    Sorry, couldn't resist. :) It's not easy and if I had a trained eye for it I might have gone into bloodstock management rather than accounting!

    I know that it's most prevalent in the horse's ability/willingness to change leads and how a horse maintains their lead and thus leg motion during the race. This is why when you see a horse switching leads a lot or switching and then switching back it's an indicator that they're not in a comfortable gallop.

    It's also why you often see catastrophic injuries happen after a lead switch and that watch like precision gets thrown off balance.
  • I keep trying to spot it in The Green Monkey's breezing video (shown below), but it really is just too fast for me to pay attention to.



    I did find this pretty good site describing the rotary gallop though, in case anybody else is interested. It seems like the key issue is that it's a four-beat, double-suspension gait, unlike the transverse gallop, which is a four-beat, single-suspension gait.

    http://vanat.cvm.umn.edu/gaits/rotGallop.html
  • Wow. That is a great site, jaefeathered. Really helps you to see the gaits. Wish they had used a cleaner-limbed model for the trot, however, as it's hard to distinguish the movement in a German Shepherd. I think the trot is the most beautiful gait to watch in dogs and horses (but not so comfortable to ride). I wish they would make a similar video for horses showing the Paso Fino gait, the rack, and other special gaits.
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