Thoroughbred Ownership Experiences

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  • I agree about him being better in September than January, for a multitude of reasons. Also I like his sire too and I have high hopes for his career at stud.

    The mare sounds amazing. I hope the foal she's carrying is a good one.
  • EliRose said:

    The mare is really lovely, she's basically been in a backyard the past few years being handled by the old owner's young kids. She was well-raised. The colt is a decent type, I'm trying to convince the other partners (my LLC are 50% owners) that he'd make a much better September horse than January. I'm a huge fan of the sire and I think his horses are just going to get better and better.

    Totally agree with your thinking hence my pinhook comment if you sell him now, You might not get the return that a later sale may bring. Always a risk foal to yearling, but he is nice type type and I see the potential
  • EriNCEriNC Member
    Star Six Nine has officially been diagnosed as having Wobbler’s. At this point he is stable, but as he will be unable to race a new home will be found for him.
  • mrsrebakermrsrebaker Member
    edited October 16
    Delete as @EriNC and I posted at the same time
  • EriNC said:

    Star Six Nine has officially been diagnosed as having Wobbler’s. At this point he is stable, but as he will be unable to race a new home will be found for him.

    I wish I could bring him home :anguished:
  • EriNC said:

    Star Six Nine has officially been diagnosed as having Wobbler’s. At this point he is stable, but as he will be unable to race a new home will be found for him.

    So sorry to hear about this! I wish the best of luck for him in his next home.
  • Diamond’s four year old filly, Mongolian Baby, just broke her maiden in her second start at Los Al!
  • EliRose said:

    Diamond’s four year old filly, Mongolian Baby, just broke her maiden in her second start at Los Al!

    Yes!! :love:
  • Star Six Nine is on turnout, being watched to make sure he doesn't regress, and to determine rehoming options.

    MyRacehorse is closing his account, and will pay out any unused funds. They are also trying to determine if he is eligible for an insurance payout due to Wobbler’s, and if so will also pay that out to shareholders.

    We will still receive updates until his account is closed (and I'm presuming he is rehomed), and we got a nice 30 second video of him on turnout.

    I hope he has a long and happy life, free of boredom and pain.
  • EriNCEriNC Member

    Star Six Nine is on turnout, being watched to make sure he doesn't regress, and to determine rehoming options.

    MyRacehorse is closing his account, and will pay out any unused funds. They are also trying to determine if he is eligible for an insurance payout due to Wobbler’s, and if so will also pay that out to shareholders.

    We will still receive updates until his account is closed (and I'm presuming he is rehomed), and we got a nice 30 second video of him on turnout.

    I hope he has a long and happy life, free of boredom and pain.

    I’m wondering if they’ve done X-rays. It’s not standard for EPM which is what they thought he originally had, but head and spinal trauma are one of the things that can cause Wobbler’s
  • Good point. I'm curious, too. I hope they did, but they aren't saying exactly what all they've done.
  • EriNCEriNC Member

    Good point. I'm curious, too. I hope they did, but they aren't saying exactly what all they've done.

    I sent an email asking. If they haven’t and he does have trauma it could at the very least allow the insurance to pay out
  • EriNCEriNC Member
    Moonlight d’Oro is being pointed towards the Seashell Stakes on 11/3 at Del Mar for her return to racing. She worked 6 furlongs today in 1:13
  • Hello everybody,

    Checking in to say that one of my two-year-olds, Social Engagement, will be making her first start on Saturday at Keeneland. It's race 1, a 6f, $30,000 claimer for 2-year-old fillies. She breaks from post position 2, with Martin Garcia up. Brendan Walsh is the trainer. The race is probably too short for her, but the idea is to give her a good experience on which to build.

    Wish us luck!

    Social Engagement is by Cupid out of Cherrryblossommis, by Langfuhr. Both her parents are gray, but she isn't!
  • EriNCEriNC Member
    edited October 21

    Star Six Nine is on turnout, being watched to make sure he doesn't regress, and to determine rehoming options.

    MyRacehorse is closing his account, and will pay out any unused funds. They are also trying to determine if he is eligible for an insurance payout due to Wobbler’s, and if so will also pay that out to shareholders.

    We will still receive updates until his account is closed (and I'm presuming he is rehomed), and we got a nice 30 second video of him on turnout.

    I hope he has a long and happy life, free of boredom and pain.

    Honestly watching that video, if the decision was on me, I would euthanize. Yes he can stand and walk in a paddock, but even in that 30 second video his affected leg almost went out on him. The other question is where is he going to go? A rescue won’t take him, the chances of him getting adopted are slim to none. Even if someone does decide they want him as a pasture buddy, what about 5, 10, or even 15 years down the road? There is no guarantee he won’t fall into a bad spot. It’s the same as those trying to rehome a lame 25 year old they don’t have time for. The other issue is that if he isn’t able to bear weight properly on all 4 limbs, he is at risk for laminitis.
  • I agree. I hope for recovery, but if the chances are as low as they are presenting, they shouldn't let him suffer. He'll suffer mentally - being a horse who loved his job and now has nothing to do - and physically, with the stress of Wobbler's and constantly having to work to stay on his feet/get up when he falls.

    I'm sure at the first sign of regression, euthanasia will be considered, if not carried out.

    Out of the two I have, Star Six Nine is my favorite, and it hurts to see him like this.

    I still hope for a long and happy life, even though I know it is hoping against hope.
  • Hello everybody,

    Checking in to say that one of my two-year-olds, Social Engagement, will be making her first start on Saturday at Keeneland. It's race 1, a 6f, $30,000 claimer for 2-year-old fillies. She breaks from post position 2, with Martin Garcia up. Brendan Walsh is the trainer. The race is probably too short for her, but the idea is to give her a good experience on which to build.

    Wish us luck!

    Social Engagement is by Cupid out of Cherrryblossommis, by Langfuhr. Both her parents are gray, but she isn't!

    Good luck!

    Lol genetics can be wild sometimes!
  • EriNC said:

    Moonlight d’Oro is being pointed towards the Seashell Stakes on 11/3 at Del Mar for her return to racing. She worked 6 furlongs today in 1:13

    I figured they had a target for her in mind when I got the workout report from Equibase. She is in my virtual stable.
  • EriNC said:

    Star Six Nine is on turnout, being watched to make sure he doesn't regress, and to determine rehoming options.

    MyRacehorse is closing his account, and will pay out any unused funds. They are also trying to determine if he is eligible for an insurance payout due to Wobbler’s, and if so will also pay that out to shareholders.

    We will still receive updates until his account is closed (and I'm presuming he is rehomed), and we got a nice 30 second video of him on turnout.

    I hope he has a long and happy life, free of boredom and pain.

    I’m wondering if they’ve done X-rays. It’s not standard for EPM which is what they thought he originally had, but head and spinal trauma are one of the things that can cause Wobbler’s
    R&R does X-rays on just about everything that walks through the door, anything suspected neuro should receive cervical and skull rads.
  • Thanks for that info :smile:
  • I agree. I hope for recovery, but if the chances are as low as they are presenting, they shouldn't let him suffer. He'll suffer mentally - being a horse who loved his job and now has nothing to do - and physically, with the stress of Wobbler's and constantly having to work to stay on his feet/get up when he falls.

    I'm sure at the first sign of regression, euthanasia will be considered, if not carried out.

    Out of the two I have, Star Six Nine is my favorite, and it hurts to see him like this.

    I still hope for a long and happy life, even though I know it is hoping against hope.

    Highly possible that they are also waiting for the insurance to decide if they want euthansia or simply loss of use and cant do anything till then.

    Interestingly enough a major new study into wobbler syndrome in young horses has just started at the vet school in Norway who posess Europe most advanced CT scanner.

    The spine consists of vertebrae, where at the back there is a canal or tunnel where the spinal cord, with all the nerves, runs through. Growth plates are responsible for the canal growing to the right size. If it does not, the channel becomes too narrow. That is what can happen with wobbler syndrome.

    There are two types of wobblers: dynamic and static. In the dynamic type, the horse only shows instability when it is in motion and the neck and head are in certain positions. In the static type, the instability can also be aggravated by movement and better with rest, but it will never completely disappear. The spinal canal is too narrow even when the horse is just standing in the stable and the new study will focus on this type.

    In the UK they do operate on horses for wobbler symdrome but the surgery is controversial and this is not done in Norway. Wobbler syndrome is graded from 0-5 degrees, and what is said about the operation is that the horse can only be two degrees better. If the horse has grade 3 or worse, it will not be completely healthy. In addition, it is very risky to operate on horses that are unstable before starting, there is a high complication rate and many operated horses never return to training.

    On horses where a specific cause of wobbler is found, such as osteoarthritis / osteoarthritis, you can inject the facet joints in the neck with cortisone, as is often done in the legs. You can also treat the whole horse with cortisone or other anti-inflammatory drugs to reduce swelling around diseased joints and pinched nerves. On young horses, ie about 1-2 years old, one can try to limit activity and protein and carbohydrate in the feed so that they grow slowly and calmly. But horses that do not respond to conservative treatment within six months will probably never do so. If the spinal canal is too narrow, these measures will not make it larger. When the growth plates close, there is not much to do. Maybe it's possible to influence something before the growth plates close - that's one of the things the new study will attempt to find out. But in that case it is the next step. In the first instance, they will describe the anatomy and development of the growth plate, and when it closes, to map what kind of window one has to work with, and how long a horse is at risk of developing young horse wobblers.

    Hopefully this will help horses in the future
  • Sounds like a very useful study. I look forward to the results.

    Star Six Nine has a large paddock and lots of room to move, so they're not worried about limiting his activity, which seems strange after reading what you just wrote.

    If trauma didn't cause his problem (like random injury in the stall) then I would presume it's caused by his spinal canal being too narrow, due to his age (2).

    Based on the fact that he can't go 30 seconds without having to catch himself, the outlook isn't good. I hope he can progress and make a miraculous recovery, but I know that's highly unlikely. So I also hope that his suffering is put to an end before he gets worse.

    Whether you own a whole horse, or just a piece of one, it hurts the same when he is hurt and you're suddenly in end of life decisions.

    I pray MyRacehorse does the right thing by him - whatever that may be - and he doesn't suffer any more than he has.

    It has now been more than 3 weeks since his hindquarter dysfunction was first reported to us.
  • KMMKMM Member
    edited October 22
    It doesn't seem fair to keep horses alive who have aggravated symptoms. They won't live a comfortable life, and resources could be better spent on other horses at risk because of where they are in the in the food chain (e.g., ownership cycle). Of course, all decisions are up to the individual owner. Some will go to great lengths to keep an animal that they love alive.
  • I agree..... :cry:

    MyRacehorse has the vet's report and should know his opinion on the matter as far as recovery chances. They are in limbo, watching him to see how he progresses or regresses in the next few weeks/months.

    In my opinion they're drawing this out longer than it needs to be. But then, I don't have the vet report and can't say for sure.

    Their wording in their updates feels like they're trying to be optimistic and not let the soft hearted, non horse knowledgeable owners worry too much.

    As of three days ago, he was not comfortable and having issues walking.
  • I will follow study and keep you guys informed as my own vet is now the lecturer in imaging/radiology at the vet school.

    Hoping for a good outcome for him, but it doesnt look promising I agree
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