Faversham (Lucky Pulpit x Love the Chase) Full Brother to California Chrome

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Comments

  • Explaining Ridglings: This article is a good read on this condition in colts and stallions

    https://www.paulickreport.com/news/ray-s-paddock/somethings-missing-here-explaining-ridglings/
  • There have been numerous studies of other species... maybe with horses as well, I just have no specific knowledge of it/them... to prove a genetic connection. As far as I know (but it has been a while...years... since this has come into any of my veterinary discussions) there has been no proven definite genetic influence... as in if you have this gene you will have this issue. PROVEN being different than establishing a TENDENCY. Additionally, what has been proven is there are any number of environmental influences.

    Since it has long been a profit-affecting issue with swine, a large number of studies have been with them. From an article on line:
    ... there has been culling against all the traits for many years in breeding herds. However, according to the published literature this appears to have no apparent impact on the frequency over time. In addition, there are examples for all the defects of herds using the same dam and boar lines but having significant differences in incidences, suggesting environmental interactions. When this occurs there is something within the environment that allows a particular genotype to exhibit the condition. This suggests ‘complex’ inheritance and possible environmental interactions.

    Studies in humans have shown a connection with a number of genetic malformation conditions, prematurity and/or low birth weight, chemicals, tobacco and alcohol usage, obesity, diabetes, etc.
  • carolinarkansascarolinarkansas hot springs, arkansasMember
    I think the condition should be considered "developmental" not genetic...
  • edited July 2017
    I saw the large number of posts and thought something new was being announced about Faversham. That he's a ridgling....that was posted here on this Discussion Thread three days before the Sarah Sapp "Pray for Faversham" post. LOL. I never saw it as a call to alarm and I agree with @bleubetty when she said "if Faversham needs some surgical procedure to correct this issue, it would be less risky and invasive today". If there is a dilemma for his connections I would think it is "to geld or not to geld". @Wezzie, your comment about the AP Indy line having an Inherent tendency to produce ridglings came to my mind too. Since Art Sherman sent him to Harris for 30 - 90 days, I assume he believes whatever issues are besetting Faversham at this time will be resolved, hopefully, within that time frame.
  • edited July 2017
    One of the issues with not doing surgery to remove the undescended testicle is in the off chance that the testicle can get wrapped around itself or something else and cause a torsion, which would be painful and therefore call for immediate surgery. In dogs the rule of thumb is if the testicles, one or both are not in the scrotum by about 16 weeks, consider it not coming down. Rarely they do come down at a later date, but its very rare. The inquinal ring will close and not let the testicles come into the scrotum at that time because the testicles have grown enough to not be able to slip up or down. I assume its the same in any male animal .
  • I think the condition should be considered "developmental" not genetic...

    The fact that it occurs more often in some families or lines is why many people think there is a genetic... at least predisposition... to it. Same thing in humans. Also, the reduction in fertility is minimal, percentage-wise.
  • I was thinking about Martin Racing’s comment about sending Faversham to Harris to let his mane down….lol….maybe a bit of a Freudian slip there. Could be a train of unconscious thought really wishing for something else to be let down.
  • WezzieWezzie Member
    :3

    I was thinking about Martin Racing’s comment about sending Faversham to Harris to let his mane down….lol….maybe a bit of a Freudian slip there. Could be a train of unconscious thought really wishing for something else to be let down.

  • That's good!
  • QueenZFan22QueenZFan22 Member
    edited July 2017
    Chrome's brother, Faversham, on sidelines with shin soreness:

    DEL MAR, Calif. – Faversham, a 2-year-old full brother to California Chrome, has gone to the sidelines with minor shin soreness and will get back to training in the fall, trainer Art Sherman said.

    “He started to get a little shinny on me, and he’s a later foal than Chrome, so we’re giving him some time off at Harris Farm,” Sherman said.

    Faversham was up to five furlongs in his workouts at Los Alamitos before the decision was made to give him time off. His last work was June 3, when he went five furlongs in 1:01.20.

    Like California Chrome, Faversham is by Lucky Pulpit, was produced by the Not For Love mare Love the Chase, and was bred by Perry Martin and Steve Coburn. Faversham is an April 12 foal. California Chrome was born Feb. 18.

    California Chrome spent his first spring at stud at Taylor Made Farm in Kentucky and is currently doing Southern Hemisphere duty in Chile.
  • edited July 2017
    Aha, I mentioned on July 13, on this thread, that might be the reason for sending him to Harris. He has a few issues that need to resolve themselves.

    Chrome's brother, Faversham, on sidelines with shin soreness: http://www.drf.com/news/chromes-brother-faversham-sidelines-shin-soreness

  • According to Martin, Faversham scheduled to rejoin Art Sherman's barn in November.
  • I wonder if he is still a ridgling.
  • Once a ridgling, always a ridgling...unless gelded.
  • carolinarkansascarolinarkansas hot springs, arkansasMember
    edited November 2017
    KMM said:

    Once a ridgling, always a ridgling...unless gelded.

    not exactly true....the undescended one can be removed and the normal one left undisturbed...I believe....if so...still a stallion...I am pretty sure I have heard of this being done but who knows....anyone know?
  • Exactly. Hence "I wonder if he is still a ridgling".
    KMM said:

    Once a ridgling, always a ridgling...unless gelded.

  • Or the undescended testicle could have finally dropped, but I have no idea the likelihood of that happening after a certain age. Anyone know?

    KMM said:

    Once a ridgling, always a ridgling...unless gelded.

    not exactly true....the undescended one can be removed and the normal one left undisturbed...I believe....if so...still a stallion...I am pretty sure I have heard of this being done but who knows....anyone know?
  • AP Indy --- Ridgling --- had surgery to remove undescinded testicle, only had one left and the results speak for themselves!
    I cited earlier in this thread when Faversham was sent to Harris Farm
  • yes, the undescended testicle can be removed and the horse left with one testicle and able to breed and impregnate mares. I have heard of testicles dropping as late as 2 years, but not normal. The reason for removal of the undescended testicle is usually done for any number of reasons, but one reason is it can wrap itself around something in the belly and cause pain and health issues. I have seen an undescended testicle literally wrapped around the kidney.
  • Faversham at Harris Farms.

  • Faversham will be sent to Sherman Barn next week (week of Nov 20th).
  • I don't know if it was ever verified or stated with certainty --- but, according to Equibase, Faversham's "sex" is now listed as Ridgling. Pedigree Query still shows his sex as a colt.

    http://www.equibase.com/profiles/Results.cfm?type=Horse
  • He's still a colt cuz it's just one testicle that has not descended yet.
  • Seem to be pretty common in thoroughbreds
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