MEDICATION REFORM WEBSITE

ninjabarbninjabarb Member
Jockey Club and TO and BA announced website dedicated to reform Medication Rules About Time something is DONE TO PROTECT THE RACE HORSE!!!!!!!!

Go to Bloodhorse.com for full article
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Comments

  • KetaKeta Member
    New web site by Jockey Club & Twitter account in support of clean racing & reducing medications
    Teresa Genaro Brooklyn Backstretch tweeted
    The new http://cleanhorseracing.org site launched today by @jockeyclub
    also has a Twitter account: @CleanHorseRaces

    Thought you'd like to add them to your Favorites, Bookmarks, and Twitter
    Nice to see support for change.
  • cigarcigar Member
    Great, I have been on it already. About time.
  • Hope they can get some steps forward.
    All states need to be under one org. for any positive to get done.
    Needs to be like the NCAA set up.

    All states, same goal,enforcement a must!!!!! No ifs, ands, or buts.
    Time to put the class back in racing. Give these horses the respect they deserve.

    Thanks Keta.
  • shirleeshirlee Member
    If horses all over the world can race without medication, ours can too. No more of this just "hand slapping." Go after owners and trainers big time. If you are going to own race horses, you have a duty to be on top of what is happening to them and that includes any medications.
  • KathyRKathyR Member
    Agree Shirlee! I've said before, I'd love to see our best and your best be able to compete either here or in the US - but it just won't happen until the drug issue is resolved. Great to see the initiative from the Jockey Club - those guys and gals risk their necks also when over medication occurs. Keep up the good fight!
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  • Bob Baffert tweeted about the move to ban race-day drugs;
    "If they take race day lasix away I will recommend to all my clients to sell their broodmares asap. Racing will not survive."

    Don't know what to think about this one...
  • mucker4evamucker4eva Member
    edited May 2012
    The sky is falling, the sky is falling.
    Is this his way of throwing a tantrum?
    I want my lasix!!!!!!!!
  • KathyRKathyR Member
    Message to Mr Baffert: if that's what he needs to train horses, he SHOULD recommend to his clients that they sell their broodmares! What a pathetic attitude! I suggest Mr Baffert spends some time watching Australian racing (? Black Caviar?) to see how it CAN be done without the drugs. But then again, there is nothing sadder than a closed mind.
  • I'd like to agree with Bob Baffert. I've had many horses over 50 years and feel I am qualified to speak to this issue as well as anyone here. We, in North America, have found a way to improve the lives of the horses we race by giving them lasix, helping control bleeding from the lungs, which happens in most horses. Because Europe is far behind and still thinks people have to ask horses to race 4 1/2 miles over 40 fences, carrying 160+ pounds to find out which horse is "best", doesn't make their ideas any more right than ours'. Lasix is the one thing that actually does help horses stay healthier by reducing bleeding, eliminating it in some. If anyone is truly interested in the health and well-being of a horse, why in the world wouldn't they be celebrating the fact that lasix can, and does help horses? It's mindboggling to imagine people wanting to take this away from these wonderful athletes, as most veterinarians have already stated. Those of you who haven't had a horse bleed, please take another look at this question, without following along behind those who have no idea what lasix actually does or thinking that 'all drugs' are horrible things. There are many things in racing that can be improved upon, and many medications that trainers should be ruled off for, that should never ever be in a horses' system for any reason. Lasix isn't one of those. Cobra venom is.
  • I'd like to agree with Bob Baffert. I've had many horses over 50 years and feel I am qualified to speak to this issue as well as anyone here. We, in North America, have found a way to improve the lives of the horses we race by giving them lasix, helping control bleeding from the lungs, which happens in most horses.
    Because Europe is far behind and still thinks people have to ask horses to race 4 1/2 miles over 40 fences, carrying 160+ pounds to find out which horse is "best", doesn't make their ideas any more right than ours'. Lasix is the one thing that actually does help horses stay healthier by reducing bleeding, eliminating it in some. If anyone is truly interested in the health and well-being of a horse, why in the world wouldn't they be celebrating the fact that lasix can, and does help horses? It's mindboggling to imagine people wanting to take this away from these wonderful athletes, as most veterinarians have already stated. Those of you who haven't had a horse bleed, please take another look at this question, without following along behind those who have no idea what lasix actually does or thinking that 'all drugs' are horrible things. There are many things in racing that can be improved upon, and many medications that trainers should be ruled off for, that should never ever be in a horses' system for any reason. Lasix isn't one of those. Cobra venom is.
    Do you have any proof that bleeding from the lungs affects most racehorses?
    Because last I heard, EIPH or bleeding from the lungs affects 2% of racehorses.

    Furthermore, furosemide or Lasix is not only a preventative medication but also a performance-enhancer. Horses who have been administered Lasix drastically lose weight shortly before a race which in effect helps them run faster.
    Studies show that a horse treated with Lasix can run up to five lengths faster than when running without.
    Horses also need time to recover between races, not from the physical exertion but from the effects of Lasix. Particularly the weight loss and the dehydration.

    I agree not all drugs are evil, but some are. Of course, Lasix helps some horses. But aren't we perpetuating a problem by allowing horses prone to bleeding to compete with the aid of medication. Which allows them to become successfull, go to the breeding shed only to have more horses prone to bleeding enter the sport? Lasix masks what should be considered a weakness in a race horse, thus allowing it to be passed on to other horses who in turn also need Lasix.

    And your comment about Europe being behind and still needing to run horses over 41/2 miles while jumping fences? Yeah, those horses do that without any Lasix.
    Black Caviar runs in Australia and just won her 21st straight race, under a hand ride, without Lasix.
    If it's possible in Europe and Australia, why not in the US?
  • KathyRKathyR Member
    If lasix is administered to all horses racing in the USA, how do you know who is, or isn't, susceptible to a serious bleeding attack? I understand that physical exertion can result in a degree of bleeding, but an extreme event is limited, as Dutch says, to around 2% of horses. I also think it lazy logic to use jumps racing as reasoning for Europe being "behind". In Australia jumps racing is limited to only two states, and is a very small component of the industry, and as I have stated before, Black Caviar is only one example of the standard that can be produced WITHOUT drugs. The most famous race in Australia, the Melbourne Cup is run over 2 miles, and another illustrious female, Makybe Diva, completed that event, three in a row (the only horse of either sex to do so) - again DRUG FREE. I also understand lasix has been implicated in the loss of calcium in the horse. What is required is a detailed study, worldwide, of fatalities in racing, and the use of lasix. I believe it is a abject failure of the system to enhance performance in a way that risks the catastrophic failure of the horse.
  • mucker4evamucker4eva Member
    edited May 2012
    Thank you Peggy. Wish Mr. Baffert would not tweet statements like that.
    He should be the first to open dialog. I can see where lasix helps,unfortunately there are some that DO NOT use it for the good.

    Maybe Baffert could help EDUCATE instead of tweeting reactionary statements that instill a one-sided,I will never budge stance.

    I have a good poppy seed cake recipe for Bob too!!!!! HA!!!!

    http://www.horsefund.org/the-chemical-horse-part-7.php
  • mucker4evamucker4eva Member
    edited May 2012
    http://cleanhorseracing.org/Default.asp?page=supporters

    Respect you elders Bob.

    All of these GENTLEMEN should be heard.These are the ones working on saving the sport.
  • My dear friends,
    I respectfully suggest that your comments come from not having knowledge or experience in this field. I also think you are being somewhat deceitful, since you proclaim horses that use lasix shouldn't be bred, "continuing the dreaded bloodlines that might produce bleeders" or however it was put. Do any of you realize you are speaking on the Zenyatta website?...one of the most marvelous mares that ever graced the racetrack...and who never made a start without lasix. Her owners and trainer KNEW that lasix didn't do any of those 'horrible things' some of you describe. This mare did more to prove the point than I ever could. She didn't come back dehydrated, with lots of weight loss at all, did she? Hundreds of people saw her after she raced. It wasn't just 'someone's idea' that she looked wonderful, was it? To whoever said lasix was a performance enhancer...horses may run better/faster the SECOND time they race with lasix, as they learn they are going to be able to breathe. It's not a performance enhancer at all, but allows them to run to their potential. The head of Rood and Riddle Veterinary Hospital stated as much, not long ago. Please be willing to study what you consider a 'problem' and rethink the persepctives you have.
  • edited May 2012
    If Lasix isn't a performance enhancer and only makes a difference from the SECOND time they receive it, why is first-time Lasix a betting angle then? A lot of bettors will use a horse in their plays just when they see they're on Lasix the first time. Why would they do that if it makes no difference whatsoever?

    And of course Zenyatta received Lasix, it's so widespread and common in racing, that not using it would put her at a disadvantage.
    I don't know if she ever had any problems after she received it, you never hear about those kind of problems in any horse. So I can't comment on that.
    Maybe some or even most horses never have any trouble after they receive the drug, which would be great.
    But there's also a possibility that we just never hear about problems like that.
    A sad fact of racing is that not everything that happens to these animals, is told to fans, bettors and the public.

    Furthermore, the things I said aren't just my opinion. They come from studies done by people who know what they are talking about.
  • mucker4evamucker4eva Member
    edited May 2012
    I'm stickin w/ the gentlemen,highly respected in the field.
  • Hi, Dutch & Mucker, I've looked up some information for you and hope you will read and consider it. Thank you.
    Australian racing jurisdictions may reconsider a ban on a substance which a new study shows can assist thoroughbred welfare.
    A drug banned in Australian horse racing has been found to significantly reduce the risk of bleeding into the lungs of thoroughbreds during racing.
    A groundbreaking study conducted by researchers at the Universities of Melbourne, Colorado State and Pretoria is the first to draw a definitive link between use of the medication furosemide (also known as frusemide, Lasix or Salix) and the effective treatment of exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage (EIPH).
    EIPH is a very common disorder in which racehorses bleed into the lungs while racing. The disorder affects up to 75 per cent of thoroughbreds around the world and has a detrimental effect on the performance of affected horses. Within the US, $35 million is spent annually on use of furosemide to treat the condition.
    However, furosemide is banned for use on race day by most countries, including Australia. Only the US, some South American countries, including Brazil, and some tracks in Canada, allow the medication to be used on race day.
    Professor Ken Hinchcliff, Dean of the Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Melbourne and co-author of the study with Professor Paul Morley, Colorado State University, and Professor Alan Guthrie, University of Pretoria in South Africa, says the study provides the most reliable information to guide the highly politicised debate over use of furosemide in horses.
    The study was published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA), and resulted in wide interest in the racing community and international press coverage.
    The work involved 167 thoroughbred racehorses performing under typical racing conditions in South Africa in November 2007. Each horse raced twice in race meetings dedicated to the study, once after receiving furosemide before the race and once after receiving a placebo.
    The horses that received the placebo were three to 11 times more likely to have EIPH as they were after administration of furosemide. In addition, about two-thirds of the horses that had EIPH after administration of the placebo had a reduction in EIPH severity when treated with furosemide.
    The study authors say the results could cause some racing jurisdictions to reconsider their ban on the use of furosemide.
    “It is likely that racing jurisdictions will reconsider, in one way or another, their position on the use of furosemide,” they say. “However, the decision to allow or disallow the use is based on the balance of a number of factors, and resolution of this complex situation will take some time. We are not advocating a particular position regarding the use of furosemide in race-horses.
    “The challenge will now be for countries such as Australia, England, Hong Kong and South Africa that do not currently permit race day use of furosemide, to balance the animal welfare aspect of being able to prevent or reduce the condition against the imperatives for drug-free racing. Additionally, instituting race day administration of furosemide would be a significant added expense to racing.
    “We believe our work is unique among studies of drug efficacy in racehorses, being similar to testing for treatment in human medicine. The drug was tested under conditions of racing and this rigorous approach to study design resulted in a very clear result.
  • Part of the opposition to Lasix on the part of the Hong Kong Jockey Club is based on their vets' firm belief that Lasix is a masking agent for some other drugs. That's a belief that most US equine vets strongly reject; the US lab chiefs say that their testing has advanced to the point where Lasix is no longer effective in hiding other drug use.

    Could the US go to a racing environment that's as drug-free as Hong Kong's? Should it? After all, Hong Kong has an incidence of serious bleeding that's more than six times as high as that in the US.
  • I will add this last thing for today, and hope you will read and consider ALL the facts that concern Lasix and the well-being of horses. Horses bleed in all parts of the world. It's not that they bleed more in the U.S. When they bleed in some other countries, they are ruled off....and merely go to the breeding shed.

    Fiction: If you can't see any blood in the nose after exercising, there was no bleeding (EIPH).

    Fact: Most cases of EIPH occur internally with no external sign of bleeding. In Japan, researchers analyzed 250,000 racing starts and found that bleeding from the nose occurred in less than 0.2 percent of the racing starts. However, in studies using an endoscope, in which a tube is passed via the nose and the veterinarian looks into the airways, researchers found that 50-70 percent of all horses that race experience EIPH at some time. In studies that evaluated airway cellular debris, results suggest that perhaps 100 percent of racehorses experience EIPH.

    Fiction: Only Thoroughbreds running flat races experience EIPH.

    Fact: Bleeding can occur with almost any type of severe exercise in horses, even with draft animals pulling heavy loads. Some horses pull up and show evidence of bleeding immediately after sudden exertion (e.g., the start of a Quarterhorse sprint). Some evidence suggests that bleeding might be more frequent in shorter, higher intensity events. At UC Davis, horses on the treadmill have bled severely when simply changing from a trot to a canter.
  • Fact: Most cases of EIPH occur internally with no external sign of bleeding. In Japan, researchers analyzed 250,000 racing starts and found that bleeding from the nose occurred in less than 0.2 percent of the racing starts. However, in studies using an endoscope, in which a tube is passed via the nose and the veterinarian looks into the airways, researchers found that 50-70 percent of all horses that race experience EIPH at some time. In studies that evaluated airway cellular debris, results suggest that perhaps 100 percent of racehorses experience EIPH.
    Above by Peggy........

    This is vague,what degree did they bleed? 1,2,3,4.......where is that data? It is a natural.
    So, now every horse would require it,even little show ponies?

    Peggy....When they bleed in some other countries, they are ruled off....and merely go to the breeding shed.

    Not always so, many are shipped to the USA ,we are used as the dumping ground for their weaklings.
  • Here's a photo of Union Rags getting some well-deserved rest at Fair Hill;

    That, thanks to Dutch.

    vs.Baffert
    After the race, I thought he'd be completely wiped out,'' Baffert said. "He cooled out pretty quick and was eating his hay in front of his stall. I was afraid he was going to go into hibernation for about three days in the corner of his stall with his ears pinned, sulking. But he never did. Bloodhorse today.

    So, I guess he has horses that do this. Sad. No horse deserve days in the corner. If they do this, then do something about it.

    Start calling it Big Pharma Racing.
  • PnkFlyd204PnkFlyd204 Member
    edited May 2012
    Ugh to this thread.

  • So, I guess he has horses that do this. Sad. No horse deserve days in the corner. If they do this, then do something about it.

    When you assume things you make an ass out of you and me.
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