training thoroughbred horse

tara180tara180 Member
im 21 and i have being saving up my money to buy a thoroughbred horse and i would like help on what a thoroughbred racehorse exercise work schedule and feeding is look like from a daily basic to a weekly basic thank you very if anyone can help

Comments

  • Tara, hope you have that horse soon. I cannont help you as to schedule etc for your horse but would think if you have a track or horse farm close by, they would help you. Perhaps Michael at Old Friends could put you in touch with someone to help you.

    Good luck and lots of love for you and your future horse.
  • Are you looking to purchase a yearling, broodmare, claimer? There are many different feeds out their to choose from. You can purchase a complete race feed or make your own. I tend to purchase the ready mixed for those running and add what I want extra to it and blend my own for the mares and foals. everyone has their own preference you just have to decide what works best for you. My husband tends to shake his head when I am feeding. He is a cattleman and claims I pull out the chemistry set daily when I feed but fails to see the irony in the whole thing because he does the same with his cows. I purchase my race feed bulk in Lexington and most areas that have tracks will have a feed store where you can make bulk purchases. Plan on having a second job to support your feed bill though. Some Thoroughbreds breathe in their calories from the air while others are hard keepers and require more to maintain.

    As far as my training schedule it varies from horse to horse. I am big into conditioning and tend to spend quite a bit of time building up endurance in my horses. Speed is a must but it is nothing if you can't carry it the distance. I use a lot of steady sustained gallops to build up their wind before I ever let them blow out and then when they do get a blow out they are always shorter in the beginning and increase each time. I have access to a pool for the horses so I use that a lot also. As your horse gets conditioned and fit you will see what kind of maintenance work he requires. I have some that can maintain on daily gallops while others I have to breeze the day before a race to keep them on edge. we all have our ways to train but you have to find the method that works the best for you and your horse. I have a few unorthodox methods that I use to build my horses legs, while others have their own "secret" methods. These are things that we have learned over time through trial and error and you will do the same over time.

    The horse business is fun but it is also a fulltime job in itself. Depending what state you are racing in determines the price of your licenses and do yourself a favor when the time comes, get a multi jurisdictional license so you only have to fingerprint once and can send the prints to up to nine states. Each state charges a different fee for the licenses, some require fingerprints while others do not. If you purchase a young horse it will most likely still need tatooed and he/she will have to break from the gates and receive a gate card before they can ever race. The tatooing has to be done at the track or a training facility where there is an authorized agent to tatoo.

    There is much more I can tell you but I must end for now. I have a small stack of registration papers to prepare, pictures to take and hair samples to pull. Have a good evening!
  • Anytime you want to expand on this feel free. Like what sorta things you add to the feed. And amounts. Do you use like a liquid vitamin supplement so it adheres better?

    What do you do about worming? Tubing use to be done by a vet--or have those rules changed?

    Have fun with the paperwork (grin). It's always something!

    Are you looking to purchase a yearling, broodmare, claimer? There are many different feeds out their to choose from. You can purchase a complete race feed or make your own. I tend to purchase the ready mixed for those running and add what I want extra to it and blend my own for the mares and foals. everyone has their own preference you just have to decide what works best for you. My husband tends to shake his head when I am feeding. He is a cattleman and claims I pull out the chemistry set daily when I feed but fails to see the irony in the whole thing because he does the same with his cows. I purchase my race feed bulk in Lexington and most areas that have tracks will have a feed store where you can make bulk purchases. Plan on having a second job to support your feed bill though. Some Thoroughbreds breathe in their calories from the air while others are hard keepers and require more to maintain.

    As far as my training schedule it varies from horse to horse. I am big into conditioning and tend to spend quite a bit of time building up endurance in my horses. Speed is a must but it is nothing if you can't carry it the distance. I use a lot of steady sustained gallops to build up their wind before I ever let them blow out and then when they do get a blow out they are always shorter in the beginning and increase each time. I have access to a pool for the horses so I use that a lot also. As your horse gets conditioned and fit you will see what kind of maintenance work he requires. I have some that can maintain on daily gallops while others I have to breeze the day before a race to keep them on edge. we all have our ways to train but you have to find the method that works the best for you and your horse. I have a few unorthodox methods that I use to build my horses legs, while others have their own "secret" methods. These are things that we have learned over time through trial and error and you will do the same over time.

    The horse business is fun but it is also a fulltime job in itself. Depending what state you are racing in determines the price of your licenses and do yourself a favor when the time comes, get a multi jurisdictional license so you only have to fingerprint once and can send the prints to up to nine states. Each state charges a different fee for the licenses, some require fingerprints while others do not. If you purchase a young horse it will most likely still need tatooed and he/she will have to break from the gates and receive a gate card before they can ever race. The tatooing has to be done at the track or a training facility where there is an authorized agent to tatoo.

    There is much more I can tell you but I must end for now. I have a small stack of registration papers to prepare, pictures to take and hair samples to pull. Have a good evening!
  • Now there's some really interesting info! Thanks for sharing just a bit of your life, Cbuechler.
  • Hey CBuechler, where are you running these days? I'm wondering if you are nearby. How many horses do you have in training?
  • thanks i buying a three year old race horse
  • Do check your finances very, very carefully before you purchase. Then check them again. Make sure you can afford not just the horse, but all the food, supplements, tack, bandages, salves, vet expenses, shoes, transportation, training expenses, insurance, licenses, and so forth. Obviously, the more you do yourself the lower your costs will be, but there will be things you can't do yourself. You also must have a retirement plan in place if the horse can't run.
  • My daughter Cheyenne is at Indiana Downs this evening, races pushed back due to the extreme heat. Also racing at Ellis Park this week.

    As far as worming I do it once a month and use a rotation to avoid resistance. Some horses get a weight builder (body builder), they all get either a liquid or powder vitamin, rice bran oil, flax seed etc. As far as hay they receive timothy and alfalfa. The broodmares can have grass hay up until their last trimester, from then on they cannot have fescue.

    I spend a small fortune on racing plates and if I can get away with getting one shod for under $105 I am doing well. That is with me keeping plates in stock and not purchasing them from the farrier. Some horses have to have a shot to get through the whole shoeing experience. Thoroughbreds are quirky beasts really. Heed my advise, if you have a foal picking his/her feet up is not enough. When you pick them up you need to cup them in your hand and apply pressure. Many horses when they start getting shod are fine with having their feet picked up but don't like the pressure of having their foot between the farriers leg.

    Big Dee's vet and tack is very reasonable for tack, wraps, etc. Keep extra of everything on hand you can never have enough. I only use hay bags if they can be hung outside the stall. There is always a chance of a horse getting hung up on a hay bag hung in the stall. Let's see what else.... I use standing wraps and no bows on my horses in the stalls but that is just personal preference. You will ultimately create your own regime and program.

    The best advice I can give you overall is spend time with your horses and get to know them. Take the time to learn about the people you have working with them. You are your horses voice and advocate. If what you are going to do to or give to your horse isn't something you would do for yourself than don't do it! Don't try to get just one more race out of your horse when you know his/her time has past. Lauraj you are also correct about the retirement plan. What are you going to do with your horse when he/she is retired. do you have an after market for retired racers in your area, they often make wonderful dressage and eventing horses. Some make wonderful lead ponies (Lava Man) afterwards while others will never be able to stand behind the gates and act like they have a lick of sense.

    Lay your plan out ahead of time. Fail to plan and you plan to fail.

    Have a good night all!
  • thanks everyone for the comments and advice i did some research and i came up with a plan hope if anyone can help if this is OK to do this is my plan
    Monday Wednesday Friday would be track work consist of galloping jogging breezing
    Tuesday and Thursday would be hill and beach workout like trotting and cantering
  • tara, your plan isn't bad, but horses need to get out 7 days a week, even if you only turn them out one day and put them on a walker one of those 7 days. Having a horse let alone a race horse is not 5 days with weekends off. A horse left in a stall for 2 days whatever you do with them won't be a happy camper. I had mostly show horses, if we weren't showing on weekends, they let me know they weren't happy being left in a stall
  • okay thanks cathy is there a email that i can contact am new and looking for help
  • First off it does matter what state you live in, without that info it's kind of hard to direct you to certain websites, etc that can help you. Personally I think Cbuechler no matter where they live is a fabulous contact. Don't go thru a blog, you can contact them directly by clicking on their name. I don't know is they are a him or her as they only said my daughter, and I don't know how much free advice they want to give out. The only way you'll know is to ask, but I would ask him/her on a personal basis rather than in a blog.
  • ok thanks
  • is there any where i can see how how to train a racehorse to run a 5/8 mile (5 furlong)
  • caseycasey any racetrack with camera in handMember
    tara180- if you really want to learn to train a racehorse, you should check at the tracks near you, and apprentice with a good trainer, who has good ethics. If you want to own a racehorse, you are better off putting it in with a trainer and allowing the trainer to "call the shots". You will need a large amount of capital in order to do it right. It's not the cost of the horse, it's the cost of the maintenance which will dig into your funds. You will need to pay a farrier for racing plates, a veterinarian to do regular radiographs, vaccines, physicals etc. You will need to pay for extra feed, stabling at the track, for grooms, hot walkers, stall cleaners. All of this adds up to big bucks.
  • Hey casey, I was always taught it's not the initial cost of the horse it's the upkeep. I was lucky we had 157 acres, 100 acres of pasture for cattle and horses, plus an indoor area, paddocks and every thing set up for the benefit of the horse. Tara, your love is what is drawing us to this blog, but I agree with casey put your purchase on hold for awhile, apprentice with a trainer in your area, if you do that, chances are they would put you in contact with the exact horse you are looking for. If not, change trainers, don't set yourself up for heartache or failure. There are a lot of horses out there, don't grab onto the first one you see or love.
  • Seven days a week is a must. Get them out doing something even if it is only walking the shedrow. Even a small round pen where they can "play" for a bit is something. You will find you have a much happier horse both mentally and physically. Expose your horse to different sights, sounds, pieces of equipment. You can't bubble wrap them and try to "protect" them all the time. If you purchase a youngster let them be just that for a while. Spend ample time with them teaching them the basics of how to lead, stand, load and generally behave properly.

    If you purchase one ready to run ask plenty of background questions and do your pedigree research. Registration papers don't race, the horse does, and there are no guarantees with any horse. Look at the horses on an individual level taking count of the animals strengths and weaknesses. I would take a horse with a modest pedigree that was more correct than one with pretty papers that stands cow hocked. Most importantly, before you purchase have a vet check the horse first. You are well within your rights to scope, scan and x-ray on your dime.

    Buy in bulk whenever you can. If I need to replace a saddle towel, blinkers, wraps, whatever I don't buy just one, I buy many so I always have a stockpile and don't have to worry about running short. There is nothing worse than needing something right now and not having it available.

    Make sure you are really ready to make the commitment. The worst thing you can do is put your horse with a trainer and walk away. Stay involved. If you are not acting as your own trainer get to the track and watch the horse as much as possible. A good trainer will advise you to do what is in the horses best interest and will not look to put them in over their heads. As an owner you are your horses voice, don't be afraid to use it.

    And remember.....in this sport you lose more than you ever win. Learn to ride the waves and enjoy all that it has to offer.
  • Wow, Cbuechler glad we agree on the 7 days a week, you are a class act, your willingness to share information is unpresidented in these blogs. If I had a racehorse I would feel comfortable putting them in your very capable hands.
  • I think this is a really, really, really expensive venture, and I can't believe that someone would go into it not knowing, or attempting to learn by asking questions on a horse blog, how to train a racehorse. Before everyone goes into beserk mode, let me also say I admire your spirit, Tara180, and hope you succeed, but I think your best bet would be to learn all you can from a local source about training racehorses. Again, before everyone jumps on me for that suggestion, let me reiterate what I have said previously on this blog: there are a lot of very knowledgeable people who visit here, and its always good to get their input also. Have you ever thought about getting a job at a racetrack as a hot walker or an exercise "boy"? While I don't know for sure, never having even had a horse, let alone a racehorse, I think common sense would suggest maybe getting your feet wet in the racing world by attempting to get a job at one of the local tracks, if you have any in the area. As Cbuechler said, this is a very big committment, and if you don't know how to train a racehorse, I would think best thing to do is hire a trainer, or learn how to yourself by getting out there and trying to get a job at a track.
  • thank u everyone for the comment and advice
  • RosebudRosebud Member
    Your welcome even though i never got a chance with some advice
Sign In or Register to comment.