Rare & Unfamiliar Horse Breeds!

Today it was interesting to learn how many of us did not know what a Knapstrupper was...So I thought I'd start a series of rare and unfamiliar horse breeds...I'll put the Knapstrupper in next. But this is my first entry:

THE MARWARI...
While visiting the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, I discovered for the first time in my life a MARWARI (mar-wah-ree)...this most unusual breed has distinctive crescent shaped ears! This particular horse shown at KHP was just one of 9 that are in the U.S.

This breed is a rare, old breed which originated in Northwest India from the region of Marwar (aka Jodhpuri). Originally used as a war horse for India's elite Rajput warriors. The nearby Khyber Pass in Pakistan served for centuries as the gateway for invasion into southern Asia. For centuries, the Rajputs defended this area with the help of their loyal and bold warhorses, the deeds of which are recorded in prose, poetry and song.

The Marwari thrived through centuries of political turmoil, until the arrival of the British decimated the breed in the first half of the 20th century. Preferring the horses they were used to, the British imported their own horses. Further, they enacted laws preventing Indian Noblemen land owning rights. Consequently, thousands of Marwari were shot, sold off for cheap labor, castrated or indiscriminately cross bred. A few held out on small remote farms, and when researchers were encouraged to take an interest in promoting the indigenous breeds, they began to make a comeback.

The Marwari is also famed as a bejeweled dancing horse of formal ceremonies and celebrations. A strain of the breed...The NATCHNI is said to be "born to dance"! Marwaris are small horses standing only 14.3 to 15 hands high. But are naturally tough and competitive...ideal for endurance racing. Today, it is a highly valued indigenous horse of India. The stepdaughter of the Ambassador to Cairo, Francis Kelly, fell in love with the Marwari and was able to have a few of them exported abroad from 2000 to 2006. Although this breed comes in all colors, the "pinto" pattern is the most popular with buyers and breeders. (Excerpts obtained from horses.animal-world.com)
More information of the breed:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marwari_horse

Photos of the Marwari at KHP:
http://animal-world.com/horses/Light-Horse-Breeds/images/Marwari2WPL_Ap4H_med.jpg
http://animal-world.com/horses/Light-Horse-Breeds/images/MarwariWPL_Ap4H.jpg
http://media-cache-ec4.pinimg.com/550x/f4/0c/b4/f40cb460033820f03b0a07eabd01adf1.jpg
Other photos:
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_Jm8EtdEOZo8/TCc9-W63PRI/AAAAAAAAAbI/YMXnOXekfUQ/s1600/DSC_1566.JPG
http://horsetalk.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/marwari2.jpg
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSbjZ48cW9cuR8aTtc6K73Omh8V6TB3EZPkVjHwTyaXHcIiR7uCQnl2tfu1

Gee can you imagine riding a Marwari and be constantly reminded of a "heart" while looking through it's ears...Sigh!
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Comments

  • I love the Marwari! I have a book that has ALL the horse breeds in it and the Marwari is one of my all-time favorites (behind the Friesian), I just absolutely fell in love with their ears!! So wish I could have one.
  • Wow how unique! Thanks for the pictures of the Marwari. Really neat looking ears. Have never seen that breed before. Can you imagine the looks one would get riding up on one? :)
  • RR12, What is the name of your book on horse breeds? And the author? The book I had as a teenager is very, very out-dated. (1950s)
  • @VA_in_CA , I believe it is called "encyclopedia of horses" but I'll have to double check when I make a trip to my mothers', where it is kept.
  • @VA_in_CA , I believe it is called "encyclopedia of horses" but I'll have to double check when I make a trip to my mothers', where it is kept.
    Hi RR12...I think I may have the same book...entitled "The Encyclopedia of Horses & Ponies, by Tamsin Pickeral. Covers 200 breeds of horses...good book to have as reference! :o)
    Too bad we can't meet all these wonderful breeds of horses in person!
  • @VA_in_CA , I believe it is called "encyclopedia of horses" but I'll have to double check when I make a trip to my mothers', where it is kept.

    Hi RR12...I think I may have the same book...entitled "The Encyclopedia of Horses & Ponies, by Tamsin Pickeral. Covers 200 breeds of horses...good book to have as reference! :o)
    Too bad we can't meet all these wonderful breeds of horses in person!

    Yes, that's it! And I remember putting many of those breeds on my "horsie wishlist" =)
  • My daughter gave me an Hermes scarf with a Marwari on it.
  • Just out of curiosity, does this book also cover the 'color' breeds (ie Palomino, Paints/Pintos)? Appaloosas are a color breed too, but they are really a breed with other definite attributes other than coloring.
  • The Encyclopedia of Horses & Ponies, by Tamsin Pickeral.
    Covers under Breeds of the World:
    1. Horses
    2. Ponies
    3. Types (This section covers the coat colors like Palomino, Paint, Appaloosa. It also covers under this section, the Knabstrup, Spotted Pony, Hunter, Cob, Hack, and Polo Pony.)
  • Just out of curiosity, does this book also cover the 'color' breeds (ie Palomino, Paints/Pintos)? Appaloosas are a color breed too, but they are really a breed with other definite attributes other than coloring.
    Appaloosas are an actual breed in the US and Canada. They have a semi-open registry, though--one parent must be registered with the Appaloosa Horse Club or with its Canadian counterpart, while the other parent may be a registered Appaloosa or may be a registered Thoroughbred, Quarter Horse, or Arabian. In some cases, horses with Appaloosa patterns and other characteristics, but without documentation, may be registered if they are gelded or spayed. In addition to their coat patterns, Appaloosas generally have white eye sclera, striped hooves, and rather sparse manes and tails. They have a stock horse/saddle horse type coonformation. Horses without the characteristic spots may be registered as their parentage allows.

    Paint horses are also an actual breed with registration requirements similar to those of the Appaloosa. In addition, horses of certain breeds that have the requred markings may be cross registered as Paints. The late Marquetry was cross registered as a Paint. Pinto, on the other hand, is a color breed. Most horses with Pinto markings can be registered with a couple of different registries in the US (draft types are excluded).
  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited June 2013
    Thanks lauraj_cincinnati! The book Encyclopedia of Horses & Ponies that I have was a 2003 edition (10 years ago)...it's a great reference book, but unfortunately, back then this book organized the Appaloosa and Paint (Pinto) under Types. Great updates/information you just provided!
  • As books get easily outdated...it would be best to get the most current edition if you do want to purchase a copy of this reference book.

    btw...lauraj_cincinnati, when did the Paint (Pinto) and the Appaloosa get reclassified as a breed of horse? This is just for our understanding/learning. :o)
  • Research I did back when I was in high school (late 60's) about the role of horses in the settling and development of our country, led me to believe the Appaloosa was a breed. It was originally developed by the Nez Perz Indians up in the northwest. They were highly prized.
  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited June 2013
    Research I did back when I was in high school (late 60's) about the role of horses in the settling and development of our country, led me to believe the Appaloosa was a breed. It was originally developed by the Nez Perz Indians up in the northwest. They were highly prized.
    Yes! I heard they (Nez Perce) were using an Akhal Teke to refine their current breeding stock. It was soo sad way back (1870s) that the US government decimated all the Nez Perce horses and put these Indians in reservations. Fortunately, some Appaloosas survived through private owners and a few were donated back to the Nez Perce. I believe that's what I remember from a documentary. I may be wrong.

    btw...I will do an overview of the rare Akhal Teke on a later posting :o)
  • Thank you all for more than answering my question. I'm going to look for that book in my local library in hopes they might have it since we have several horse breeding farms in the general vicinity. There used to be more, including a Thoroughbred farm, but it has given way to scillions of houses. Bleah. Or maybe I can find it at Amazon.com.

    I read a good historical novel maybe 15 years ago about the Nez Perce Appaloosas. I also am a great admirer of Chief Joseph and the tribe as a whole. The street I live on here in Cherry Valley, CA is called Nez Perce. I think that is so cool.
  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited June 2013
    Talk about Nez Perce...When I visited Jackson Hole, Wyoming, we got to check out the awesome Grand Tetons and one of the peaks was also named Nez Perce. Beautiful country around the Tetons...lots of wildlife too!
  • Thank you all for more than answering my question. I'm going to look for that book in my local library in hopes they might have it since we have several horse breeding farms in the general vicinity. There used to be more, including a Thoroughbred farm, but it has given way to scillions of houses. Bleah. Or maybe I can find it at Amazon.com.
    At Amazon.com
    The Complete Encyclopedia of Horses and Ponies (Hardcover) by Tamsin Pickeral : The latest edition out is 2005: Doesn't show the book cover on this link however. $16.91 on up
    http://www.amazon.com/Encyclopedia-Horses-Ponies-Tamsin-Pickeral/dp/0760772770

    The Complete Encyclopedia of Horses and Ponies (paperback-2005 Edition by Tamsin Pickeral): From $4.95 on up
    http://www.amazon.com/The-Complete-Encyclopedia-Horses-Ponies/dp/1405443901
  • Photo from 1915

  • RachelRachel Member
    didnt think they had color photos back then :P
  • edited June 2013
    That's a really interesting looking horse. It's beautiful! Almost doesn't look real.
  • RachelRachel Member
    its a Marwari
  • edited June 2013
    Rache
    didnt think they had color photos back then :P
    Good point....that didn't even enter my mind. Saw the 1915 and took it as the "year", but maybe it's just a number identification.
  • The 1915 is just part of the file name.
  • The 1915 is just part of the file name.
    Makes sense. I hope that beautiful horse is still with us, no way if the pic was from 1915, haha.

  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited June 2013
    On 6/7/13:

    Paint horses are also an actual breed with registration requirements similar to those of the Appaloosa. In addition, horses of certain breeds that have the requred markings may be cross registered as Paints. The late Marquetry was cross registered as a Paint. Pinto, on the other hand, is a color breed. Most horses with Pinto markings can be registered with a couple of different registries in the US (draft types are excluded).
    Before I provide another rare breed of horse in this discussion topic...I always have a problem truly understanding the difference between a PAINT vs a PINTO. I have heard several definitions such as: a Paint is an actual "Breed" with pedigree registrations (ie Quarter Horse, Thoroughbred) and a Pinto is a coat color category (ie Palomino as found on mustangs, other breeds, etc.) in other words...a Paint can be a Pinto, but a Pinto cannot be a Paint.

    Is the above definition correct? Or could you explain in layman's terms the actual difference? Thanks!
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