Good Books?

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  • KMMKMM Member
    There was an excellent fictional work that won book award a couple of years ago about small town track modeled on Charleston. Not for everybody. Sex et all but the horses had vivid personalities. Book named after one of horse characters. Will look it up. Quirky book but I liked it. Jane Smiley has also written some good horse stories, novels for different age groups. She has horses and I think has shown some. I think she might also have racetrack connections. K
  • The Byerley Turk looks very interesting, @Paniolo_Gal! Thanks for posting about it; it's definitely a book I want to read sometime.

    You're welcome!
    I'm not sure if you or others from our forum recall last year, in the
    Rare & Unfamiliar Breeds Discussion (the bottom of page 3) about the Akhal Teke-a relative of the Turkoman and that this ancient Bactrian (a Persian region of Central Asia) breed was the first domesticated horse breed...way older than the Arabian. Jeremy James probably came to the same conclusion in his research for the first racehorse...the Byerley Turk with his findings on the chanfrons (equine face plates) in Istanbul.❤

    If interested, here's a quick link to page 3 from the Rare & Unfamiliar Breeds discussion...scroll to the bottom of the page:
    http://www.zenyatta.com/discussions#/discussion/683/rare-unfamiliar-horse-breeds/p3
    Thanks PG, I just saw this. Fascinating to read about the Akhal Teke. I had never heard that they were an older breed than the Arabian.

  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited April 2015
    It's not official as they are doing archeological test sampling of the equine bones of past eras but ancient written and current scientific evidence seems to be swaying along the concept that the Akhal Teke ancestoral bloodlines are much older than the Arabians as the oldest domesticated horse. :oD
    btw...The Akhal Teke and the now extinct Turkoman relative had large ears...so does our Zennie! :oD
  • Very cool about the large ears! Do you know if Zen traces back to the Byerley Turk? :)
  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited April 2015
    Very cool about the large ears! Do you know if Zen traces back to the Byerley Turk? :)
    Yes...Zenyatta's dam lineage (tail female) goes back over 30 generations to the Byerley Turk (1680c) through Byerley Turk's son Jigg-GB) (1700c). Before the Byerley Turk...Further back on the tail female are vague lineages to a Darcy's Yellow Turk (1665) through his son Brimmer (date?), and a Places White Turk (1670c) out of Trumpet's Dam (date?). Then...even further back goes down to a Dodsworth Mare (date?) → Dodsworth Barb (1670c) x Layton Barb mare→Family Number 4.

    Her sireline (tail male) traces back 27 generations to the Darley Arabian (1700).
  • I think one would find that most, maybe all, Thoroughbreds are descended from all three founding sires, through multiple lines.
  • Paniolo_GalPaniolo_Gal Member
    edited April 2015
    I think one would find that most, maybe all, Thoroughbreds are descended from all three founding sires, through multiple lines.
    Yes...I did mention that in another posting about most, if not all thoroughbreds descend from all three foundation sires...in a different discussion topic recently. But...95% of thoroughbreds today descend from the Darley Arabian (top and bottom)...which makes Zenyatta's tail-female lineage unusual. They had a discussion about her pedigree years ago when she starting getting public attention. :oD
  • caseycasey any racetrack with camera in handMember
    Very first favorite book - Marguerite Henry's "King of the Wind". That started my love of racing. I read every one of her books, Walter Farley's Black Stallion series, loved Mary O'Hara's My Friend Flicka. I too love "the Lady" and wish that Anne McCaffrey would write a sequel to it......
  • @casey - I also wish that Anne McCaffrey had wrote a sequel to The Lady. That remains one of my all time favorites.
  • Casey did you also read the sequels to My Friend Flicka? Thunderhead is a darker kind of book than the other two, but I read (past tense) it every year along with them regardless. I started reading them at age ten and read them every year well into my 30s. I still read them again every now and then. The last one is Green Grass of Wyoming. I thought of that book when I read about some of the problem-child behaviors of Coz this week and it reminded me of Thunderhead as a race horse.
  • caseycasey any racetrack with camera in handMember
    Yes, Virginia, I did read all the sequels.
  • Given how terribly Todd has done with the Pern books in the last few years, since he was writing them as Anne was ailing, and then has taken over since her death, I too wish Anne had written a sequel to The Lady as I don't think her son can do it justice.
  • No. She definitely knew horses. My daughter and I have always thought that her dragons in the Pern series were very horse like in personality.
  • I stumbled on to this quote today and thought it was good enough to share:

    "Great horses are not often easy horses. They have big egos and idiosyncrasies and quirks and foibles. Horses of a lifetime do exist, but only for riders so skillful, tactful, and courageous that they can unlock and then reveal the brilliance of their equine partners." Denny Emerson, USEA Hall of Fame Rider
  • Awesome. Thanks!
    I stumbled on to this quote today and thought it was good enough to share:

    "Great horses are not often easy horses. They have big egos and idiosyncrasies and quirks and foibles. Horses of a lifetime do exist, but only for riders so skillful, tactful, and courageous that they can unlock and then reveal the brilliance of their equine partners." Denny Emerson, USEA Hall of Fame Rider
  • Big eventer! Actually hope it isn't true for all horses.
  • VA_in_CAVA_in_CA Member
    edited September 2015
    Apparently only the "great" ones, and not all of them.
  • Denny has an ego, too. Great rider, great trainer, old style, not young.
  • I stumbled on to this quote today and thought it was good enough to share:

    "Great horses are not often easy horses. They have big egos and idiosyncrasies and quirks and foibles. Horses of a lifetime do exist, but only for riders so skillful, tactful, and courageous that they can unlock and then reveal the brilliance of their equine partners." Denny Emerson, USEA Hall of Fame Rider
    OTOH, you have Snowman, who was a HoF jumper and also a kid's horse and lesson horse.
  • I stumbled on to this quote today and thought it was good enough to share:

    "Great horses are not often easy horses. They have big egos and idiosyncrasies and quirks and foibles. Horses of a lifetime do exist, but only for riders so skillful, tactful, and courageous that they can unlock and then reveal the brilliance of their equine partners." Denny Emerson, USEA Hall of Fame Rider

    OTOH, you have Snowman, who was a HoF jumper and also a kid's horse and lesson horse.
    Very good example. And he did say that great horses are not often easy horses. But sometimes you get that miracle horse that has the perfect combination of skill and a willing personality.

  • He does have a big ego; ergo he is describing himself somewhat.:)
  • I don't think in particular great horses have to be difficult.
  • No. I don't think great horses have to be difficult.
    The quote brought to my mind Zenyatta for one. John Shirreffs and Steve Willard describe her as pretty challenging as a youngster. Until they did things her way.
    Man O' War was reportedly difficult and fiery to handle but obviously brilliant. Seabiscuit is another who was difficult and ended up with his traveling companion and roommates.
    On the other hand you have horses like American Pharoah and California Chrome who are described as straight forward.
    And Snowman with his propensity for jumping out of his pasture might have been described as challenging from that perspective.
    I guess I just liked the quote because it made me think about how sometimes you have to persevere and work and be brave to get to that glory point.
    And I didn't intend the quote to say all great horses are difficult. I just liked it as thought provoking and so wanted to share it.
  • I just take exception with Denny's wording "but only for riders so skillful, tactful, and courageous that they can unlock and then reveal the brilliance of their equine partners."

    I kind of think that the exceptional horses reveal themselves.
  • I think that the partnership is important. There are some horses that don't suit every rider. And that some will be brilliant with one rider and not with another.
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