TRANSPORTING A HORSE

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  • Anyone know if horses freak out when they're in a plane? I remember in the movie International Velvet one of the horses got out of control on the plane and had to be euthanized. :( (Not saying that's what happens in real life, but just curious if they have to sedate some horses to keep them calm.)
  • KetaKeta Member
    Yes, Keta, great picture! I would love to know what kind of plane that is. It looks huge! It looks a lot bigger than the Sutton planes do inside. This one looks more like a military transport plane.
    In length and size it looks like a 747
    Caption doesn't say.
    Posted below is an entire article from the Palm Beach newspaper.
    It includes a photo gallery.
    Keta

  • KetaKeta Member
    edited March 2015
    EQUESTRIAN LIFE
    PBIA’s most pampered passengers? Flying on ‘Air Horse One’
    By Staci Sturrock - Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015
    It’s boarding time for the Boeing 727 parked on the tarmac at Palm Beach International Airport, and the flight crew is ready to show passengers to their stalls.
    “Bring me the filly first and put the gelding in the middle!” yells Stephen Gravett, flight supervisor for H.E. “Tex” Sutton Forwarding, one of the first companies to fly equine athletes to race tracks and show arenas, via 29 airports in the U.S. and Canada.
    And these commuters fly in first-class style: Non-stop itineraries. In-flight snacks. Plenty of leg room.
    No wonder the Sutton Forwarding flagship has been dubbed “Air Horse One.”
    http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/lifestyles/pbias-most-pampered-passengers-flying-on-air-horse/nkHKq/
    icmp=pbp_internallink_invitationbox_apr2013_pbpstubtomypbp_launch#bf2afc22.3412093.735655
  • KetaKeta Member
    It took me a while to find my way back here, but thanks for the information Zenyen. I thought it was probably the owner, but I'd love to know more about how this all works (i.e., what expenses the trainer incurs vs what expenses are paid by the owner). Clearly the "purchase price" of a thoroughbred is only the beginning . . . . (and why most of us will never have one).
    Sandy, the owner pays transportation costs. The trainer may recommend & decide with owner what races a horse is in.
    In the Palm Beach article, the cost one way of transporting a horse by air is approximately $3000 to $5000 each way depending on destination.
    That cost probably does not include the van cost or the cost of the personal groom who travels with the horse.
    The purchase price is only the beginning.
    Hugs, Keta
  • KetaKeta Member
    I travel along the New York State Thruway from Rochester to Long Island a few times a year - i have seen the big Sallee and Brookledge rigs stopped at rest stops. I have never seen a horse unloaded - just people going in and out - checking on them - filling buckets. I would imagine that is the kind of breaks they take when making a 600 mile trek.
    Air Horse One flights are all non-stop.
    All flights are equipped with hay to keep the horse busy while in flight.
    Grooms and helpers travel with them.

  • KetaKeta Member
    Anyone know if horses freak out when they're in a plane? I remember in the movie International Velvet one of the horses got out of control on the plane and had to be euthanized. :( (Not saying that's what happens in real life, but just curious if they have to sedate some horses to keep them calm.)
    Some horses travel better than others. For example: Art Sherman has said more than once that California Chrome is a great traveler.
    As to sedating, not a question I can answer directly. However, I would think it would not be a good thing. You don't want a horse to go down in flight-stalls are built for standing. And, you would want to avoid a medical emergency in flight-bad reaction to sedation. Just my thoughts.
    This part of the Palm Beach article was interesting:
    'And from the time these travelers are loaded into a van at a stable in one state, until they’re led into the barn in another, their feet never touch the ground. Custom-designed loading ramps with high walls allow the horses to walk directly onto the plane from the truck that brought them to the airport.
    “It’s easier on the horse, and a lot safer,” Gravett says. “They don’t know the difference. They think they’re getting on another truck.”


  • Anyone know if horses freak out when they're in a plane? I remember in the movie International Velvet one of the horses got out of control on the plane and had to be euthanized. :( (Not saying that's what happens in real life, but just curious if they have to sedate some horses to keep them calm.)
    Yes, it does happen in real life. There was a famous horse named Markham who had to be euthanized on a flight to Tokyo for the 1964 Olympics after becoming restless & disruptive endangering lives of the people and other horses.
    This is a good article that explains sedation & possibility of euthanasia.
    http://www.nj.com/hunterdon-county-democrat/index.ssf/2012/07/hunterdon_business_helps_the_u.html
  • KetaKeta Member
    edited March 2015
    Louise,
    Excellent find. Good article.
    Here is the story of Markham. He was flying in a prop plane not a jet.
    Shipping boxes/stalls were much smaller than the ones used today.
    Considering the number of horse who fly each year, it is the safest way to ship.
    Hugs, Keta

    As Joseph C. O'Dea, DVM, the U.S. Equestrian Team's veterinarian from 1955 through 1975, recounted in Olympic Vet, the confined quarters of the shipping box themselves can cause a horse to panic and scramble. The USET veterinarian faced a particularly harrowing situation en route to the 1964 Tokyo Olympic Games, when J. Michael Plumb's three-day-event mount, Markham, panicked in midair. The horse had recently suffered a bad experience on a van ride, and evidently the turbulence the Super Constellation propeller-driven aircraft encountered on the flight from New Jersey's Newark International Airport triggered bad memories. Markham became increasingly uncontrollable; and sedatives, twitching, blindfolding, and other attempts at restraint had little effect. The horse managed to get his front feet over the front panel of his shipping box--which was considerably smaller and more flimsy than today's "air stables"--and began bashing the aircraft's ceiling panels. The flight engineer ordered O'Dea and team coach Bertalan de Nèmethy to do something, and De Nèmethy reluctantly instructed the veterinarian to administer the lethal injection
  • Thank you, Keta! I never had heard the whole story. Poor horse and I'm sure it was much more dangerous on the kind of plane they were in compared to modern jets. I've heard of others in more modern times, but can't find a name. It is a possibility that they have to be prepared for, though. I can't imagine how scary a 1200 lb, out of control horse would be in an airplane. Yikes!
  • KetaKeta Member
    edited August 2016
    VIDEO - Road to Rio: Transporting the Equine Athletes
    Americas Best Racing August 4 2016
    https://www.americasbestracing.net/videos/2016-road-rio-transporting-the-equine-athletes

    Interesting video of horses headed to the Olympics.
    This is a different configurations than Air Hose One.
  • JFK’s Ark pampers livestock bound for air travel
    Updated February 21, 2017 10:04 PM
    By Maria Alvarez Special to Newsday
    Not even the animals on Noah’s Ark received the individualized pampering and attention — including an Italian opera serenade — that today’s livestock experiences before boarding an international flight.
    The ARK — a new horse and livestock export center at Kennedy Airport — played the soothing tenor of Luciano Pavarotti for seven horses from Pennsylvania as they stood in fresh bedding in roomy stalls being hydrated, relaxed and examined by a veterinarian before boarding their 11 p.m. flight to Scotland on Tuesday.
    “It’s like a fine hotel,” said John Cuticelli Jr., founder of The ARK. “The occupants [horses] can roll around and enjoy their bedding and stomp their feet.”
    http://www.newsday.com/news/new-york/jfk-s-ark-pampers-livestock-bound-for-air-travel-1.13157880
  • KetaKeta Member
    New App Seeks to Streamline Shipping Process
    By Brian DiDonato TDN Wednesday, March 22, 2017
    The best ideas and inventions are usually born out of the necessity to fix or improve a situation, and new horse transportation app EQUIRIDE seeks to do just that.
    The “lightbulb moment” for the founders of EQUIRIDE came when trainer Stephen Lyster voiced his frustrations to Chris Woodside, a college friend and fellow graduate of the University of Kentucky.
    http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/new-app-seeks-to-streamline-shipping-process/
    From article
    The easiest way to describe EQUIRIDE is to compare it to the popular equivalents for human transport–Uber and Lyft.
    Once a user has downloaded the app, s/he can sign up as an owner, trainer, driver, or any combination of those distinctions.
  • KetaKeta Member
    Excellent VIDEO of how horses travel.
    Plane is Air Horse One
    Always Dreaming Arrives at Pimlico 5 9 2017

  • Cool video! Thanks!
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